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Pricing Advice

What users are saying about Windows 10 pricing:
  • "I'm not sure about how much it's priced in the consumer world, but within enterprise it comes in a Microsoft 365 license, which is very easy. It has become an easier commercial model."
  • "Windows 10 has multiple versions—Home, Home Premium, and Enterprise—so the pricing will be different for each version. The pricing is okay and if they're getting sold out, that means people are buying it. I must say, it's a monopoly, but I really like the way Microsoft fits into the monopoly."

Windows 10 Reviews

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KC
Digital Workplace Solutions Architect and Presales at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Modern apps and features like Windows Hello provide a consumer-friendly experience

Pros and Cons

  • "One feature I have found most valuable is Windows Hello. Windows Hello brings in a password-less solution, wherein users don't need to type in their password. They can do biometric logins or pin-based logins."
  • "The negative is that the OS has made the room heavier, so it requires much more hardware than before."

What is our primary use case?

I think it's used by the majority of enterprise customers. It's the primary workspace for virtual desktop computing as well, and most of the native Windows applications use Windows 10 as the base operating system. For example, SAP applications for financial transactions or development applications, which require Visual Studio and Visual Basic. Most of the developers still use Windows as their primary operating system. Although there is a penetration of Mac and Linux going as well into the environments, Windows is the most dominant OS at this point.

It is predominantly on-premises, but as I'm specialized in virtual Azure computing, anything I deploy on Azure uses Windows 10 as well. For the Azure Virtual Desktop product, under the hood we deploy Windows 10 to deliver those virtual instances to the end users. It's physical plus virtual.

We have around 69,000 employees in our company, and 99% of them are working with Windows 10.

What is most valuable?

One feature I have found most valuable is Windows Hello. Windows Hello brings in a password-less solution, wherein users don't need to type in their password. They can do biometric logins or pin-based logins. It has also come up with some modern apps, which is useful for an app store kind of experience, like when we open Google Store or Play Store on our Androids or devices. So, that is important. I think adding apps to the system has become relatively easy with Windows 10, and I think it also comes with the modern experience. More widgets, more notifications, which are consumer friendly.

It already has a wide penetration in the enterprise environment, as well as a consumer environment. There is an ecosystem that is already built, and Windows fits well there. Replacing it with another operating system will require a lot of investment, as well as training the users. There's a sharp learning curve if we have to change the operating system. There are business workflows that are already built. There's a lot of documentation, a lot of IP that the industry has built around Windows, and changing that base layer will actually invalidate all that IP.

What needs improvement?

The negative is that the OS has made the room heavier, so it requires much more hardware than before. That's based on Moore's Law, that you will keep increasing the hardware as the application keeps developing.

The experience could be a little more modernized. I can't compare it with Android, where the experience is really user friendly. The compatibility of having an Android app being run inside a simulator on Windows is something that can be added. I think that's still a long way to go, but I think that's a scenario that could possibly address some of the concerns.

For how long have I used the solution?

I started deploying Windows 10 around 2015 or 2016, so four or five years. That's when we started an upgrade project for a big insurance industry client. They had about 10 sites wherein they had to upgrade the laptop industrial environment from Windows 7 to Windows 10. That's where we used SCCM, which is predominantly called the contact manager. We used that to upgrade all the systems there.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

From a performance standpoint, it's very stable. Stability is very, very high. We don't see a lot of apps failing or a lot of things failing in the system, and it has a wider compatibility. We have more universal drivers, more peripherals that can be added, more features of the modern world like biometric single sign-on fingerprints. Everything is getting very well integrated. Overall, they are well-engineered solutions. From a performance standpoint, I think it's not about the OS, but what Microsoft is also making its own native apps heavier. 

I think Windows has become more stable if I compare it to the previous generations of Windows, which used to create more errors and more blue screen of death scenarios. Recently, I haven't seen that many.

Within the OS, they would supply some of the native tools, like OneDrive and Teams. They have some performance challenges, which Microsoft isn't addressing very well, at least up to six months ago when I last read about it and last tried it. It uses an indefinite amount of resources, which is a concern for a majority of the environment. In a physical environment, you won't see that many problems, but yes, in a virtual environment, because the things go into a ripple effect, the problem increases. I don't know where it will fall within the OS or the application teams of Microsoft, but it's still a concern. For something that is very much integrated into your operating system, like OneDrive and Teams, it has to be addressed.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

There are tools and features like Hyper-V, wherein you can run virtual machines inside Windows 10 and add new functionality, like making it as a server, like an IaaS server. Scalability is easy. It's quite user friendly if I compare it with any other operating system. Windows gives you the most scalability across any other OS.

How are customer service and support?

My personal experience with technical support wasn't very good. This is not for the consumer world, but for the enterprise world. I usually log cases from an organization point of view. There are some regions that do not provide in-depth technical support. They would take a screen sharing session and take a lot of time on your system and actually hijack your system. You won't be able to do anything else. They just want to start from A, B, C, D. You don't always want to start there because you're expected to know up to at least G or H. That's where you should start. So, that was a painful experience for me. It has happened at least a couple of times in the last two years when I logged some cases. For two out of three cases I had, this was what I experienced with technical support.

How was the initial setup?

There are ways of doing it that have gotten better in the last few years. The traditional way of deploying it is still cumbersome and complex. For the native on-premise tools that you use, Configuration Manager, you put in all the drivers and customize those images. It has become a little simpler compared to the past, but it's still in the range of medium complexity. The simpler way is you buy a device, any retail device, and then you enroll it with a modern management solution like Intune. The OS works as a mobile OS, not as a fat client OS, and that's the reason it can easily gain the enterprise class abilities, by running a package on top of it. That part is easy. Both options are available: a simple option and a medium complexity option. In most cases, enterprises still have to go with the medium complexity option because they're bound to that and because the new solution isn't for everyone.

The formal method of deployment, the relatively complex method I was talking about to engineer that solution, takes about two to three months at least just for the engineering itself and then deployment. Of course, we won't do it on a single device. We do it on multiple devices in phases, and that takes around 6 to 12 months. Overall, you can consider an 18-month deployment for an organization with an average of 5,000 to 10,000 devices.

That's a typical deployment timeline you would see. Of course, there are people who are trying to shorten that timeline, but that timeline is the default.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I'm not sure about how much it's priced in the consumer world, but within enterprise it comes with a Microsoft 365 license, which is very easy. It has become an easier commercial model. Microsoft licensing was always a great pain for every enterprise customer because it was so complicated. It was so complex to understand and comprehend that in any large deal we had to give a call to our licensing officer from Microsoft, and only they could solve those complexities. Now we can at least take some of the rudimentary decisions and some of the basic calculations. From a pricing standpoint, it's well priced. I guess it's not a lot to ask for, especially when it comes along with a package for the solution. It's quite competitive.

What other advice do I have?

I would rate this solution 9 out of 10.

My advice is to leapfrog and not look at Windows 10 anymore. Start looking at Windows 11. The long path, the safer approach if you're not an agile organization that makes quick decisions, and you want to run a marathon rather than a sprint, is to go for a traditional upgrade into Windows 10. There is an upgrade path that is already available in a more seamless manner through some of the enterprise tools that are available.

My advice would be to go agile, sprint it out, rip and replace your devices with the brand new Windows 11 and then get it enrolled into your enterprise environment. Of course, doing a POC would be part of the story. It would be better to go with 11 directly because 10 and 11 are not very different. if you go to 10, you will take almost the same time as you would take for 11.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
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Ankit Rajan
Functional Consultant at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
Consultant
Good user experience and easy to multitask

Pros and Cons

  • "One of the most valuable features is the ease of multitasking. It's easy to switch over different applications and multitasking is very free and flawless. Another useful feature is the ability to recover any data from a crash. Multiple benchmarking applications are supported by Windows, which isn't the case with Linux. So in case you need an application, you can Google it, find it, and easily install it. The user experience is also good. If you have the SSD installed in the laptop or machine, it will start like a boom. Windows is always ahead."
  • "Windows 10 could be improved by providing a data recovery application default. This is the most critical thing I have ever figured out in my career. If you accidentally deleted the data from the machine—the local machine—there is no way to get it back unless you install a third-party application. When your machine is connected to an IP domain, sometimes you won't be able to install a third-party application because it becomes a compliance issue, so you can get in trouble. Windows 10 should provide a data recovery solution."

What is our primary use case?

My primary use case of Windows is to run VMware. We have migrated about 47,000 machines in the environment, all of which are using Windows 10

How has it helped my organization?

In Microsoft, in general, it's easy to configure the AD Group Policy and the exchange server. Previously, I was working with on-prem, and the PowerShell command is flawless. In our organization, Publisher and AD Group Policy have been beneficial. Also, if you want to switch over to using VMware at the same time, you can switch it. 

What is most valuable?

One of the most valuable features is the ease of multitasking. It's easy to switch over different applications and multitasking is very free and flawless. Another useful feature is the ability to recover any data from a crash. Multiple benchmarking applications are supported by Windows, which isn't the case with Linux. So in case you need an application, you can Google it, find it, and easily install it. The user experience is also good. If you have the SSD installed in the laptop or machine, it will start like a boom. Windows is always ahead. 

What needs improvement?

Windows 10 could be improved by providing a data recovery application default. This is the most critical thing I have ever figured out in my career. If you accidentally deleted the data from the machine—the local machine—there is no way to get it back unless you install a third-party application. When your machine is connected to an IP domain, sometimes you won't be able to install a third-party application because it becomes a compliance issue, so you can get in trouble. Windows 10 should provide a data recovery solution.

For additional features, I would like Windows to come with a powerful video editor. If I am developing a presentation or something, I have to find it myself somewhere. If you want to put in GI for any kind of video and do a presentation, it's pretty difficult to open a video, edit it, or do anything. If you have a video, you can simply add it, right? But there's no Microsoft in-house product for that—we have to use Adobe Photoshop or something. There are just some little, very small features that, if Microsoft added, would make life easier. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been working with Windows 10 since I started my career. This is the default machine in India—the first OS is Windows, then Linux, and then Unix. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Windows 10 is stable. Unless there are any hardware issues or any bugs in an update, Windows performs perfectly. Any patches and updates are directly handled by the SCCM team, and they test it before deploying it. If there are any bugs or if anything is compromised, they will fix it. They won't upload it to the server unless and until it's 110% perfect. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Windows 10 is easy to scale. We have 47,000 to 48,000 users working on Windows 10, and we have an onboarding team to help them understand how things work, what the policies are, and what the dos and don'ts are. 

How are customer service and support?

Three or four years ago, I contacted Microsoft support. I had a problem with OneDrive, which is a product of Microsoft, so they fixed it. They took six to seven days to get my OneDrive completely back. The experience was wonderful and my problem was resolved. 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We previously worked with Windows 7—the most stable version of the millennium, we called it. It's flawless. That's the word for Windows 7: flawless. Once Windows 10 appeared in the market, it was a little buggy with application updates and packaging. Now, they have stabilized things. 

Windows 7's boot time was much longer than Windows 10, so the UI experience was not too good. You can't install Windows 7 on the touch laptop because it won't give you the 110% exact feel of the touch panel. If you're using a Yoga kind of product—where you have the laptop and you can detach the screen, which then becomes your tablet—you can't use Windows 7. Windows 10 has features for tablet mode. 

How was the initial setup?

The process is really, really straightforward. If you have a bootable hard drive, it might take more than 15 to 18 minutes. If someone is deploying it from the local site—not from the server—it's a fairly smooth and flawless process. Most of the instructions are on-screen and it will prompt you to do everything. It's easy to understand because the UI feature is really awesome and built smoothly. A newbie can do it easily. Nothing is in the backend or encrypted within the commands. It's purely simple and easy to deploy locally. 

I have 17 people in the SCCM team who developed the OS as per the organization policies and what we call a golden image. In a project, if a client wants a Cisco AnyConnect VPN, that has to be implanted into the same OS. So they have their labs and they develop it with their security, firewalls, everything. Everything is synchronized from there in the labs, and then it is deployed. 

What about the implementation team?

We implemented through an in-house team. 

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Windows 10 has multiple versions—Home, Home Premium, and Enterprise—so the pricing will be different for each version. The pricing is okay and if they're getting sold out, that means people are buying it. I must say, it's a monopoly, but I really like the way Microsoft fits into the monopoly. 

What other advice do I have?

I rate Windows 10 an eight and a half out of ten, just because I have some requirements for improvement, such as the data recovery and video editing screen. 

Windows 10 is easy on the eyes because it has a dark mode feature. We work 16, 17, 18 hours on our laptop—I call it a second wife, because it is sometimes. We have 24 hours in a day, but we spend hours of it on the machine. You should use dark mode and lower the brightness to your liking, and continue your work. You will feel better. 

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
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Learn what your peers think about Windows 10. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2021.
555,358 professionals have used our research since 2012.
WW
Business development manager for data protection solutions at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
MSP
User-friendly interface and good wireless connectivity

Pros and Cons

  • "One useful feature of Windows 10 is its connectivity with mobile devices and ability to make cableless connections with external devices."
  • "So it would be nice to have the option to switch between this design and the previous one. Working with Windows 7, I preferred to use commands or applications like in the old version."

What is our primary use case?

Some basic Office applications are based on Microsoft Office 365 nowadays. However, we use special tools like VMware Workstation to do things like play with some samples of visualizer and visualize versions of your products as simulators. With some tools, it's necessary to connect to our remote or local lab and make small presentations like a demo of our solutions for customers. I'm not a software developer, so I'm not experienced with stuff like that. I'm not also experienced with using any cloud services besides Office 365.

What is most valuable?

The user interface is somehow good for me because it's based on web design and all this user-friendly stuff. It allows for faster selection of applications and it streamlines research functions, like obtaining that information file or something like this. One useful feature of Windows 10 is its connectivity with mobile devices and ability to make cableless connections with external devices. Windows 10 has made some improvements in performance, so it's not consuming hardware resources like Windows 7. 

What needs improvement?

It's hard to define how Windows 10 could be improved. I've been using Windows for years, and every time I see progress, so I'm focused on the positive instead of the negative. But it's time-consuming to struggle with some issues. I don't think it's worth the time I have to spend fixing or finding something. 

In terms of ways to improve Windows 10, I would like more interface options for this desktop. Right now, it's like a web design network with all these icons from Microsoft. The work area is selected by news collected from the outside, with some application set but not the full scope of the application I've installed. So it would be nice to have the option to switch between this design and the previous one. Working with Windows 7, I preferred to use commands or applications like in the old version. So it would be nice to be able to change the look and feel of the design. 

And, of course, we are always talking about the security of private and professional data. So I hope for more protection against ransomware attacks. I expect that this will be included in a software update. Of course, I know that it could be covered by separate antivirus software, but I think that Microsoft has something like this included for home use, private use, and professional use. A company might accept the level of security offered by standard Microsoft software. It could be fine, but if not, there is always the option of buying something additional. Microsoft's security rules are a disadvantage, but then again, I can expect every company to use something like that.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using Windows 10 for a year or more. We updated our internal setup from Windows 7 to Windows 10. It was a time-consuming process.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I have no complaints about Windows 10's stability and experience. Everything works perfectly and is acceptable at the level of observation. So I there haven't been too many problematic cases I would like to talk about. 

How are customer service and support?

Our delivery and support team takes care of our customer's products sometimes. Based on our partnership with Microsoft, which is gold level, we have to contact the support team at Microsoft. But every issue coming from using Windows 10 and so on is always fixed by our internal IT service team. So we have no direct contact with Microsoft with any problems like that.

How was the initial setup?

If you have a Plus Drive installed on your device, installing Windows 10 is pretty convenient. However, I don't have any experience with the setup because I'm using a standard corporate computer, which our internal IT staff prefers. So I am not involved in the process of installing Windows 10 from scratch. I get a ready-to-use laptop with some personalizations. I have to log in and use the correct password to make all corporate resources available on my device. However, in my personal life, I have seen progress with installation from version 7 to version 10. Maintenance on Windows 10 is done by a separate technical team that reacts to tickets and requests for support. They also make recommendations to fix something that is not working correctly. Sometimes they'll help when there are issues with corporate rules, like security, privileges, and accessing Active Directory. Also, when there was a migration happening in the background, like migration from Office 2016 to Office 365, there were some problems with migrating smoothly. We had to wait until our IT team fixed some features that were not accessible.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Microsoft's licensing strategy is constantly changing. In a few years, we might only be using cloud versions for the Microsoft operating system. That's my prediction. So I'm not expecting a general improvement on that. For example, I know the average price of a standard operating system for home use, but I see the enterprise version much more expensive than the version for home users. I'm usually buying products for private use based on my company's different price preferences. So I have no billing platform included in the device. I'm not buying hardware and software separately. I'm always buying this combined version that includes the hardware and software.

What other advice do I have?

I rate Windows 10 eight out of 10. Windows is dominating the market. But, of course, everyone knows about Microsoft operating systems. However, some people who have had a bad experience are switching to Linux versions or Macros systems. But I don't think it's necessary to recommend and promote software like that because Microsoft is one of many creating software for home use and professional use with end-user devices.

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
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LD
Director Lean Infrastructure at a tech services company with 201-500 employees
Real User
Top 5
Familiarity, maturity and popular productivity tools make this OS almost indispensable

Pros and Cons

  • "It is familiar and mature and runs the most popular productivity tools."
  • "The operating system could be more configurable and compatible in integrating with other operating systems."
  • "The core of the operating system needs work to become more stable and less complex. The need to occasionally re-install should not be necessary."

What is our primary use case?

I am using Windows 10 together with Ubuntu Linux as an operating system.  

What is most valuable?

I am in the technical, IT area. I love the new Windows subsystem for Linux. Version two came out recently. I like the new functionality and mostly the better integration between the networks and the Windows 10 core system.  

I also like that Windows is great for gaming. The gaming experience may actually be the thing that I like the most personally.  

What needs improvement?

I always compare products with the competition or what open-source products are doing. I would love for Microsoft to provide or participate in more open-source projects. They could do more expansion with less R&D and learn from what other developers do.  

The Windows interface could be much more flexible from a perspective of the user's experience. If you compare other operating systems to the standard Windows desktop experience, the level of configuration for Windows is not so great. You should be able to do more to customize it from the way it looks to the way it performs.  

What I also do not likes is the core of the Windows architecture. The registries and complexities that may help it to run fast also lead to issues, latent files, and other issues. Everyone who uses the product knows about having to reinstall Windows. This problem is something that still exists in the latest versions. The operating system works against itself and becomes slower after months of usage. The lag is more apparent if you install a lot of different applications. Eventually, this causes more serious issues and you need to reinstall the operating system. This is not something that you ever have to do on a Linux operating system. Linux is much more flexible. It is much cleaner and it is much easier to configure to your needs.  

One other issue I have with Microsoft — more than just the Windows operating system — is the lack of compatibility of their productivity tools suite. Nowadays, most people cannot live without their Office applications. Microsoft is the leader in this. Their Office products are not supported on Linux. In my opinion, the real reason people are still using Windows is not that it is a great operating system, it is because of the integrated productivity tools and familiarity.  

For Windows, the core of the operating system needs improvement from the perspective of flexibility and stability.  

As far as additional features, it is hard to really pinpoint something that Windows is missing. I think from a feature perspective and as a mature product, they are already pretty feature-heavy. They essentially have everything that a person could need and I do believe that Microsoft is doing a great job from the perspective of continually providing new features.  

I would prefer that they further developed the possibility of running other operating system applications. I like the features we got from Windows 10 to help incorporate the use of the Linux system. But I would love it if they made the effort to further expand on that.  

So the ability to better integrate with and run other operating systems would be a nice addition.  

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using the Windows OS product since Windows 3.1 or 3.11. So, I have more than 15 years of experience with Windows. We have been working with Windows 10 for about four years.  

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

In general, the stability of the Windows operating system has greatly improved over the years. The latest versions of Windows 10 is the most improved and it is much better than it was. It still has room for improvement.  

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We currently have about 250 people using Windows 10 in our organization. There is no real scalability concern.  

How are customer service and technical support?

I am an ex-Microsoft employee, so I do have experience with technical support for Microsoft and the Windows 10 product. The guys on that team are great. They are certainly going out and doing their best. They are helpful. They have made a huge improvement over the last few years. They changed a lot of things in the process of how they work with customers. But honestly, I very rarely open a ticket related to Windows 10. I do not find a need for that. I am in the IT field. I fix issues all the time by myself if I have any with the operating system.  

But the support team is helpful and improved.  

How was the initial setup?

The installation is very straightforward.  

What other advice do I have?

Any advice I have for people considering this product depends on the use case. I would definitely recommend using Windows 10 as an operating system and a familiar choice. But I would definitely also recommend trying other operating systems. It is very important to know what other operating systems have to offer. This one operating system has massive dominance on the market and I do not like the way that 90% of the people are using only Microsoft products without even considering anything else. It is limiting. So my advice is: learn more about other desktop experiences and try Linux as well to see the differences and what it has to offer. 

On the scale from one to ten where one is the worst and ten is the best, I would rate Windows 10 as an eight-out-of-ten. Eight is a good rating but Windows can be better. 

Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
ItishaYadav
Data Scientist at Instant systems Inc.
Real User
Scalable with good stability, however it needs a better system for initiating updates

Pros and Cons

  • "The solution is scalable. If an organization needs to expand it out, they shouldn't run into issues doing so."
  • "The only thing which concerns me is updates. It gets updated often. Sometimes, however, it automatically gets updated. That is an issue. It can happen when you do not want it to be done. It's possible it can start and your files are not saved. They may be open while your laptop enters sleep mode. Then, when you re-open the computer to continue work, it all of a sudden decides to update, destroying your work."

What is most valuable?

I don't know if I can discuss the solution in relation to other Windows versions, however, I can compare it to other OS like Unbuntu. For example, it's quite a secure operating system. The ease with which you can download different Python libraries is very good there. 

If you're a developer, you can do everything with the help of the Command Prompt and console. 

What needs improvement?

I'm more into artificial intelligence and the data science side. So I do not like Windows that much.

Setting up the environment variable, etc., needs improvement. This is true not only for Windows 10 but for Windows as a whole. It is currently a huge mess. Due to this, working with many libraries and packages becomes a difficult task. If they could find a better solution or a replacement for environment variables, I'd be extremely happy.

The only thing which concerns me is updates. It gets updated often. Sometimes, however, it automatically gets updated. That is an issue. It can happen when you do not want it to be done. It's possible it can start and your files are not saved. They may be open while your laptop enters sleep mode. Then, when you re-open the computer to continue work, it all of a sudden decides to update, destroying your work. 

Once I accidentally did something that erased hidden folders on the C drive. It caused a lot of issues. Windows got corrupted on me. They should work to ensure that it isn't possible to accidentally delete these files or there should be a replica for them on the hard disc or something of that nature.

Google has functionality whereby if you have your email ID open on your phone, on your Android phone, that means you can sync everything on your Google drive. The same thing should be provided by Microsoft. I do not think Microsoft provides a dedicated account to every valid Windows holder. This should be done so that everything you have on your local system should be somehow in synchronization with the cloud. That way, if something happens, like your laptop is stolen, or your laptop is corrupted all of a sudden, your data is not misplaced. You have your data somewhere. A sync with the cloud service should be available.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using the solution for seven to eight months at this point. It's been less than a year.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Windows 10 is a stable solution; it provides everything. There's a good Windows store where you can go and get your apps. There are other things also that Microsoft provides as well. For example, on Windows, you can download a virtual machine. If you want to use Ubuntu, as I do, due to the fact that I am more comfortable with Ubuntu, you can download the VM there on Windows and start with your work. 

Everything is provided by Windows, and things are stable. If I talk about Windows only, in between OS such as Linux, then I'd say Linux is better. However, overall, Windows 10 is pretty reliable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The solution is scalable. If an organization needs to expand it out, they shouldn't run into issues doing so.

How are customer service and technical support?

So far I haven't had to reach out to technical support; I can't speak to its quality of service or the level of responsiveness to queries.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I have experience with Unbuntu as well. I used Unbuntu about a year back. Now I'm using Windows for data science. Initially, I used Ubuntu for data science. So I've used both the platforms.

The commands are very good and very easy in Ubuntu as compared to Windows. In Windows, you'll have to do a lot of things. You need to, for example set the environment variable, etc., which is not necessary in Ubuntu. You can directly download and put it in your user directory. You can also utilize the services from there. So I would say from the developer's point of view, and from an AI practitioner's point of view, Linux Ubuntu is a good option to go for.

How was the initial setup?

While I found that the initial setup was very straightforward on Linux's Ubuntu, it was a bit complex and much harder in Windows. It's not straightforward per se.

I haven't used Windows 10  for deployment. I've used the Linux machine only. Deploying on Ubuntu won't take much of a time. It's very easy.

What other advice do I have?

We're just customers. We don't have a business relationship with the vendor.

I'm not sure which version of the solution I'm using currently is.

Windows 10 is quite a stable version of the solution. If you compare it with Windows 8, it is much, much better. If one wants to use Windows as an operating system, I would recommend it. If one is more comfortable with other operating systems, they can run it in a virtual machine and give partition on Windows so that half of the memory is allocated for other OS. 

I'd rate the solution seven out of ten.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
MY
IT at a financial services firm with 201-500 employees
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
A stable solution that allows for effective management and boasts a built-in antivirus firewall

Pros and Cons

  • "Windows 10 is unique in that it comes with its own antivirus firewall, which obviates the need to purchase one separately."
  • "I would prefer to see an OS that is lighter."

What is our primary use case?

I can't really speak of a use case per say. Anything on a computer requires an operating system to run it and this is where Windows 10 comes in. 

What is most valuable?

First off, I would count stability as a valuable feature. Then, I would mention Microsoft's effective management.

Moreover, Windows 10 is unique in that it comes with its own antivirus firewall, which obviates the need to purchase one separately. Although we have an antivirus enterprise, the Windows 10 antivirus and anti-spam features can be relied on in their own right. 

Take me, for example. I don't have an antivirus solution on my personal computer at home, but rely on the feature that comes with Windows 10. I have had no issues with the security. At work we make use of Symantec as our official antivirus solution and this is to provide the company with extra security measures. 

So, out of the box, you can get a stable, efficient and secure solution in Windows 10. 

What needs improvement?

I would prefer to see an OS that is lighter. We are currently in the process of reviewing the OS and it seems we can get away with using it without the need to pay a license fee. We are talking about a UNIX server OS that is very light and can be installed on any device, even a tension one, such as a PC. If this can be used to run things effectively then it means that the OS is really good. We're going to test it in the areas of security, functionality and adaptability to the environment. I need to be integrated to an active directory. 

So these are some of the models and key features that we're going to test to see if we can install them in our environments, get them working with our active directory, and examine if our solution, our applications, are compatible with them. If the OS can perform these key functions then perhaps we can consider getting laptops and computers that do not require OS or that come with three BSD, for example, which would allow us to do installation. 

I don't know if I would recommend Windows 10. The resource consumption can stand improvement. Much memory is used up and this quickly leads to the CPU running out. 

The operating system should be optimized to a point where it manages RAM and re-computes computer resources much more effectively. When an application is running on Windows 10 it has a tendency to consume the entire RAM. Once optimized, very weak machines would be able to effectively run Windows 10. If, for example, one were running a graphics intensive application on Windows 10, the entire memory would tend to be consumed, the application would drag and the RAM would be insufficient to run it. A terminal check would demonstrate that even the functionality of Windows 10 would be excessively consuming the resources of the system. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I cannot say for certain for how long I have been using Windows 10, although I do know that it has been a long time, perhaps since 2016. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The solution is stable. 

How are customer service and technical support?

I'm satisfied with the solution's technical support.

How was the initial setup?

The solution is pretty straightforward and easy to install. 

Deployment does not take more than 15 minutes, give or take. 90 percent of the systems we purchase come with Windows 10 pre-installed. The process is pretty easy. One just need follow the prompts and put in his region, time, zone and preferred language. The next step is to join the domain, at which point the user is built and work can commence. 

What about the implementation team?

While installation can be done independently, it would really be up to the IT department to get this done. 

What other advice do I have?

There is currently no integration of which to speak concerning Windows 10. It is a workstation ware.

The solution is also deployed on-premises. It basically serves as a workstation OS. This is the OS I want, one for use as a normal office work tool. 

I use the solution on my personal PC and also in my organization for its purposes of laptop billing.

Everybody's PC runs on Windows 10. We are talking about more than 500 users. 

I would definitely recommend the solution to others. It is about the best OS obtainable at present.

As Windows 10 consumes a lot of resources I will rate it as an eight out of ten. 

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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NS
Senior Consultant at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
Consultant
Easy to set up and use with a very nice GUI

Pros and Cons

  • "The product is quite user-friendly and easy to navigate."
  • "The security could be improved. I have had colleagues who have gotten their files corrupted somehow."

What is our primary use case?

We are using this operating system for all of the functionality on offer. We have different machines on which we are using Eggplant to perform the functional testing. All those machines are currently on Windows 10 only since users have been using Windows 10 already, and it's quite user-friendly. 

In all the cases where machines are present, we are performing the test over Windows 10 and using this Eggplant with all the different types of applications for the functionality users. Based on those tests, we are capturing data.

How has it helped my organization?

In the previous versions, you could get a copy of data or pirated data also, however, with Windows 10, as it is genuine software, it helped us a lot in avoiding this. It also has added security features and auto-updates. The upgrading of the software is very easy now.

What is most valuable?

The product is quite user-friendly and easy to navigate.

The GUI is quite impressive. We don't need to go into any command-line interface. Most of the things you can use with the click of a mouse. 

The initial setup is very easy.

What needs improvement?

Sometimes we getting slowness issues while performing some heavy operations. We aren't multitasking or anything, however, some heavy load is there. In those times, Windows 10 is not responding as we would like it to. They need to improve this.

As of now, I haven't seen many ain points per see. However, whether we're upgrading the software or clearing the cache, it would help us if the solution was more responsive.

The security could be improved. I have had colleagues who have gotten their files corrupted somehow.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using the solution for maybe three or four years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's quite stable and is easy to work with as you don't need very special skills. 

As of now, I haven't had any downtime or any blockage due to the software or OS. Of course, the slowness issue sometimes stops us a lot. The upgrades can be frustrating as they sometimes start an update when we are working. If it's between the working times, it's not a problem.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It is quite easy to integrate add-on solutions and we've found that the scalability is fine in Windows 10. You don't have to do anything extra in that we can install easily, and we can use the software easily wherever it's required.

Within my team, my project, all of us are using Windows 10 since the project itself is dependent on Windows 10. We have around 10 people on our project. We are senior consultants, test engineers, test analysts, project managers, and test analysts.

How are customer service and technical support?

We haven't reached out to technical support. Right now, things are running smoothly and therefore there's no reason to be in touch. Therefore, I can't speak to how helpful or responsive they are. 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Previously, we may have been using Windows 7. We haven't used a different operating system. It's always been Microsoft.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is very straightforward. It's not a complex process at all.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We have an in-built, permanent license. I can't speak to how much it costs our company.

What other advice do I have?

I'm just a customer and an end-user.

I would recommend this solution. It's not ideal for very heavy projects, however, for moderate or medium-type of projects that do not have a very heavy load or too much multitasking, Windows 10 is excellent.

Windows 10 makes for pretty comfortable working. It doesn't need users to be experienced in anything. If you want to start a new thing with Windows 10 OS, you don't need to worry about that. You can get into it easily. You don't need to have knowledge of any specific things so that you can catch up with the solution and how to use it easily.

I'd rate the solution at an eight out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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WK
Founder, President & COO at a analyst firm with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
A versatile operating system from the most valuable company in the world

Pros and Cons

  • "My impression is that the security via windows defender is good enough that I no longer feel a need for another third-party security solution."
  • "Everything's tied-in via Bluetooth; it's kind of a pain in the ass because it hijacks your calls."

What is our primary use case?

My laptop is my work and life laptop. I'm a small business owner — my laptop is my lifeblood. More recently, with all this COVID stuff and remote learning, I had to repurpose a couple of my older laptops that deprecated out of my own personal use; I made them suitable for my kids to use for online education. That's what led me to upgrade them from Windows seven to Windows 10.

Everybody in my company uses Windows 10.

Our entire DevOps team works on Microsoft machines. I suppose there are hip little companies out there that use Apple products — that's ineffable to me. I think Windows has done a good job of addressing a lot of concerns around stability and computational inefficiency. It used to be the case that when you were doing more complex, high-intensity computing, you probably needed to be on Linux machines. I don't think that's as true as it used to be. I know smart people that use Apple, but it blows my mind.

What is most valuable?

My impression is that the security via windows defender is good enough that I no longer feel a need for another third-party security solution, which had always been the case in the past. I think that perception still holds true. I might be wrong about that, but prior to Windows 10, I always felt obliged to go with, Norton or McAfee as an additional anti-virus service. So, I began reading reviews and got comfortable with the idea that Windows Defender as a primary security system was good enough.

What needs improvement?

I don't like a lot of the features that are in it. I'm still somewhat archaic in that I like the form-factor of a traditional laptop: I don't want to touch my screen; I don't want it to behave like a tablet; I don't want it to bend in weird ways that I'm never actually going to use. There are a lot of features in Windows 10 that seem to be designed for it to be deployed on a Window's surface or something like that. I don't want that Cortana voice feature. I don't need to talk to my laptop. The phone application where you can integrate your smartphone with it so that you can directly view images that are on your phone, that feature sucks. Everything's tied-in via Bluetooth; it's kind of a pain in the ass because it hijacks your calls.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using Windows 10 for roughly two and a half years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Stability-wise, it's pretty good. I put it through its paces more than most people. Outlook doesn't integrate nearly well enough with Google Mail Servers. I think that's more than a Microsoft Office issue than windows. Still, when you host your mail on Google (I host with Google but I use Outlook as an email client), the integration is poor. Google or Outlook issue some new updates once every couple of months that make them play worse together for a week. It's kind of annoying. I think it's a conscious business decision though. I suspect foul play on both sides.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

As I use Windows 10 for personal use, I can't comment on the scalability.

How are customer service and technical support?

The only thing I've ever used Window's tech support for was to upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 10, which you're able to do for free. Which is cool.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is pretty straightforward — it's Windows. Microsoft is one of the largest, most valuable companies in the world despite not being ever seen as cool, newer, sexy.

What other advice do I have?

My advice would be to go ahead and use Windows 10. Overall, on a scale from one to ten, I would give this solution a rating of eight.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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