We changed our name from IT Central Station: Here's why
Computer Manager at a university with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
Easy to scale and update with good scalability
Pros and Cons
  • "You can scale the solution quite well."
  • "The solution has a bit of a learning curve. It's not too high, however, you do need to understand the solution to deploy it and work with it effectively."

What is our primary use case?

I'm using it for a file server and for MySQL servers. Those are my primary uses.

What is most valuable?

The solution is easy to install and easy to update.

You can scale the solution quite well.

What needs improvement?

The solution has a bit of a learning curve. It's not too high, however, you do need to understand the solution to deploy it and work with it effectively.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've used the solution for a while. I've used it extensively in the last 12 months at least, and over the last two years in general.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability is mostly pretty good. The only issue with stability was with power knocking out, and therefore I put a UPS on it. That seemed to solve any issues going forward. It doesn't crash or freeze. There are no bugs or glitches. It's quite good now.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Linux offers very good scalability potential. If a company needs to expand it, it can do so.

I just use the solution for personal use. I don't have a big team using it.

How are customer service and technical support?

I've never used technical support in the past. I can't speak to how helpful or responsive they are.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

While I've been a Mac person since the Mac first came out in 1984, I've added Linux for my server items. I didn't really switch to anything else; I've just added onto what I already do.

How was the initial setup?

It's an operating system and when you install an operating system new, there are all sorts of things you have to go do and go read up on such as how do I do this and how do I do this? For me, it went very, very well, however, it's not something I can do in an afternoon. It took several days to get everything proper. However, it went well so there are no complaints at all in terms of the initial setup.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I can't speak to Unbuntu versus Red Hat or other Linux solutions, however, I am aware that some people use them.

What other advice do I have?

I'm using the solution more for myself. I'm just an end-user. I don't have a business relationship with Linux.

I'm using the latest stable version. If they publish a stable version and then they publish an experimental option, I won't use it. I'll stick with the stable option. 

It's not something that you run on the cloud. It's what's behind cloud services. I've got an Ubuntu machine at home that I use regularly, but it is also my MySQL server and a file server, all in one box.

FileMaker, I know very well and MySQL, I'm learning quickly. Linux, I'm a beginner admin on it. I'm not in a position to make any comments pro or con enough, as I don't know enough about it to make a valid comment.

I'd rate the solution nine out of ten. I've been very happy with it.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Mukesh Regmi
Co-Founder- Operation & Digital technology transformation at Cloudtreez
Real User
Top 5
Good interface and pretty stable but the initial setup can be difficult
Pros and Cons
  • "They have provided a new interface, which is great."
  • "You need a lot of bandwidth during the initial setup in order to pull from the repository. Without good bandwidth, you'll get cut off and the implementation will fail."

What is our primary use case?

I primarily use it in my day to day work to test my products. There are a lot of open-source tools on the market, and I need this product to have something to deploy them on.

What is most valuable?

I prefer the new organization of Ubuntu. The repository is excellent.

They have provided a new interface, which is great. 

I don't need the UI so much as the CLI, however, both are excellent.

What needs improvement?

While for the most part, I am quite happy with the new developments on the solution, from my perspective (and as a user or a solutions architect), the product needs to keep on doing enhancements according to the needs sprouting out of recent developments in technology.

There should be a CI/CD process for all software that it is on the market.

Overall, the solution offers me exactly what I need. I'm not really missing any features.

You need a lot of bandwidth during the initial setup in order to pull from the repository. Without good bandwidth, you'll get cut off and the implementation will fail.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using the solution for about four or five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability is good. Whatever I've needed to maintain, I've been able to on Unbuntu. It doesn't crash or freeze and it's not buggy. I find it to be reliable.

That said, they do have to look at their security measures and maybe tighten those up a bit.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I'm not sure about the scalability of the solution. It may be how you use the solution and how you set it up.

We're just a startup with a small team of maybe ten people. We aren't a big organization.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I'm familiar with many different options, including CentOS, Red Hat, and SUSE. I prefer Unbuntu out of all of these. However, it is a personal preference. Each has its own pros and cons.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is not very complex although I wouldn't exactly describe it as straightforward. You need to have the right people on it. Those that understand the industry will have an easier time. Otherwise, it might not connect to the correct server and will get disconnected, causing the implementation import to fail. 

Countries that lack bandwidth need Unbuntu to offer a CAP server so they can pull off the repository and do updates and upgrades that won't fail if the bandwidth cuts.

Therefore, it's not necessarily the installation itself that gives you trouble. Unbuntu needs to get closer to the countries in order to make it easier to pull from the repository easily.

What other advice do I have?

I highly recommend the solution. It's very popular among developers. It's worked quite well for us.

Of course, solutions like Red Hat and CentOS also have good capabilities. For us, however, Unbuntu is the best.

Overall, I'd rate the solution seven out of ten. It offers me basically everything I need and has worked well for our team.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Learn what your peers think about Ubuntu Linux. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: January 2022.
564,599 professionals have used our research since 2012.
IT Manager at a comms service provider with 1-10 employees
Real User
You get most of the packages you need and all the latest updates very fast
Pros and Cons
  • "Ubuntu is great because you get most of the packages or software you need. You get the latest updates and stuff fairly fast."
  • "We don't have any support, so we search for answers online. However, it can sometimes be a little messy to find the information if you have a highly specific question or a strange problem. It would be nice if finding information were a little simpler. Maybe they could have some portal that could point you to where you can find information."

What is our primary use case?

We use Ubuntu Linux for software development to create a desktop environment for our developers, and we also have some VMs running Ubuntu-based services. 

What is most valuable?

Ubuntu is great because you get most of the packages or software you need. You get the latest updates and stuff fairly fast. 

What needs improvement?

We don't have any support, so we search for answers online. However, it can sometimes be a little messy to find the information if you have a highly specific question or a strange problem. It would be nice if finding information were a little simpler. Maybe they could have some portal that could point you to where you can find information. I think that's more of a general issue with open-source stuff. That's how it works.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using Ubuntu for three or four years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

For desktop usage, we find Ubuntu is quite stable. We seldom have a problem with it even running on laptops. I think it's one of the better Linux distributions for running on laptops, and it supports various kinds of laptop hardware. 

How are customer service and support?

We don't have any paid support. We use open-source knowledge bases or forums. We're used to that, so that works fine actually. We haven't tried any professional services for support because we manage the clients ourselves.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We use different Linux distributions depending on our needs. Ubuntu is good for our desktop workstations, but Red Hat is server based, and it's more stable over time, so we use that on the server for backend stuff. It depends on where it's going to run. We use Ubuntu for workstations and Red Hat or CentOS on the server side.

Ubuntu might have some room for improvement on the server side. But then again, we haven't used it much for that use case, so I don't know. It's easier for me to say what Red Hat or CentOS are missing on the desktop side. Nothing comes to mind that Ubuntu is missing in terms of desktop deployments. 

How was the initial setup?

Setting up Ubuntu is fairly simple. It's just a workstation, so that's a relatively straightforward setup. 

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We have special workstations with Ubuntu preloaded because it was the best for artificial intelligence within the hardware. We got the whole system, including the hardware, software, and setup. We have support with the total package, but that's the only thing we have to pay for, and we haven't needed to use that support. In general, we don't have any license costs for Linux systems. Some of the Red Hat systems have license costs, but most are open-source or free versions.

What other advice do I have?

I would rate Ubuntu eight out of 10.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Flag as inappropriate
Director Lean Infrastructure at a tech services company with 201-500 employees
Real User
Top 5
Easy installation without too much configuration; lacking support for graphic drivers
Pros and Cons
  • "Doesn't require significant manual configuration."
  • "Could be better support for graphic drivers and support from the hardware lenders."

What is our primary use case?

I'm a customer of Ubuntu Linux and work as director lead infrastructure. 

What is most valuable?

I love the way that they introduced the Linux system by making a lot of user adjustments for beginners who'd never used Linux before. It makes the solution much more feasible for people who have never used this operating system before to start using it without too much manual configuration. The way that they included third-party drivers for easy installation is great, for example, as are drivers for the video drivers Nvidia and ATI. The operating system is customizable which is also an excellent feature. Basically, you can do almost anything you can imagine from a user interface perspective.

They also do a lot of interesting investment and they make their operating system really usable and adjustable for server systems as well. They have their own Kubernetes offering, which can be used within their operating system. It's great for IT pros.

What needs improvement?

What I think could be improved greatly is the support for the majority of hardware vendors like ATI, Nvidia, and all the other vendors producing hardware and supplying perfect drivers for Windows operating system, but they don't care much for Linux. Canonical are doing a great job, but the third-party support and the vendors should be paying more attention to the Linux operating system, not only with Microsoft drivers and so on.

I'd like to see better support for graphic drivers and support from the hardware lenders when they next provide an update. I believe the third-party vendors are putting their efforts in development for the operating system that has better penetration among users. Unfortunately, they're not paying too much attention because not so many people are using Linux at the moment. It's not their priority. Another aspect might be that the vendors don't like to put a lot of effort into their support and drivers for Linux, because the community that uses Linux is geared towards open source software, and the vendors are rarely happy about that. Still, most of the vendors put their major efforts into the Microsoft ecosystem. I believe it's all due to the market penetration, but it would be great if we could see improvement in this area. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using this solution since it came on the market. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I think it's very stable. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I think it's very scalable due to the nature of the architecture. It's a reliable operating system.

How are customer service and technical support?

We haven't had any need to contact technical support. 

What other advice do I have?

I recommend Ubuntu for any user looking to try Linux for the first time. And I believe that most of the things they need would be just working out of the box.

I would rate this solution a seven out of 10. 

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Operations Manager at a retailer with 201-500 employees
Real User
Top 20
Good user interface and a straightforward setup but have not used it long enough to really gauge its usefulness
Pros and Cons
  • "The solution has a very good graphical user interface."
  • "After only a week of using the solution, we haven't really found any limitations or missing features."

What is most valuable?

We're still in the learning phase. However, from what I have seen in the short time I've used it, it's been rather user-friendly.

The installation is pretty straightforward.

The solution has a very good graphical user interface.

What needs improvement?

After only a week of using the solution, we haven't really found any limitations or missing features. The experience has been pretty good so far.

For how long have I used the solution?

We're very new to the solution. We're still learning about the product. It's only been a week or so, so far.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability, so far, has been good. We haven't had any issues with bugs or glitches. It doesn't crash or freeze on us. It's been very reliable so far.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have about 20 users on the solution currently. However, I've mostly restricted the usage to just myself as I explore the solution. It's still early days. We haven't done any scaling.

While the solution is still new to us, we'll continue to use it so long as the solution itself proves to be useful to the company.

How are customer service and technical support?

We haven't yet dealt with technical support in any way. Therefore, I can't speak to their level of knowledge or responsiveness.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I did previously use a different solution, however this was recommended to us by colleagues and we're trying it out.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is not complex. It's pretty straightforward. We didn't have any issues implementing the product.

The deployment was pretty fast as well. We had it set up within an hour.

What about the implementation team?

I handled the implementation myself. I didn't need the assistance of an integrator or consultant.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The solution isn't really expensive at this time. So far the version we are using goes, it is being used on the virtual machine. That was a free download.

What other advice do I have?

We've just installed Ubuntu very recently. I'm just trying to see how it is right now. We have it installed on Windows 10 Pro. While we use the on-premises version, we're very interested in exploring the cloud.

I'm not sure just yet if I would recommend the product to others simply due to the fact that I've basically just started using it. I need at least a month of working on it in order to be able to tell if it works how we hope it will and if I would recommend it to others.

Right now, I would recommend the solution at a six out of ten. I need more time to really analyze it properly.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Co-Founder at a tech services company with 1-10 employees
Real User
Top 5
Developer-friendly and easily accessible
Pros and Cons
  • "The most valuable feature is that it's developer-friendly and easily accessible. Like any other Linux operating system, you have access to open sources, all the necessary tooling, and anything that helps developers do their work. I'm no Linux guru, but Ubuntu offers packages that I find easy to use. There are other options for people who are very skilled with Linux, but this solution has the perfect balance of having enough technical requirements to meet your needs while still being usable. It doesn't require you to be so technically proficient that you need to recompile kernels or anything like that. It's a Linux operating system for normal people."
  • "The only improvement I would suggest is to switching back to Aptitude. They switched a lot of the packages that used to be running in Aptitude to Snap. I don't find them as usable when they are in Snap. The most obvious instance of this is that it's caused me to have issues with Chrome. Starting Chrome took a couple of seconds before it was up and running, which wasn't pleasant. Back when it used to run packaging in Aptitude, I didn't have this problem. I know they're familiar with these issues because a lot of other people have experienced them too."

What is our primary use case?

My primary use case is for office work and developing software. 

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is that it's developer-friendly and easily accessible. Like any other Linux operating system, you have access to open sources, all the necessary tooling, and anything that helps developers do their work. I'm no Linux guru, but Ubuntu offers packages that I find easy to use. There are other options for people who are very skilled with Linux, but this solution has the perfect balance of having enough technical requirements to meet your needs while still being usable. It doesn't require you to be so technically proficient that you need to recompile kernels or anything like that. It's a Linux operating system for normal people. 

What needs improvement?

The only improvement I would suggest is to switching back to Aptitude. They switched a lot of the packages that used to be running in Aptitude to Snap. I don't find them as usable when they are in Snap. The most obvious instance of this is that it's caused me to have issues with Chrome. Starting Chrome took a couple of seconds before it was up and running, which wasn't pleasant. Back when it used to run packaging in Aptitude, I didn't have this problem. I know they're familiar with these issues because a lot of other people have experienced them too. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using this solution for five years. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

This solution is stable. 

How are customer service and support?

I have never contacted technical support, but I probably will in the future. They offer very good services. 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I use Windows 10 because I have to, due to the programs I have that came with it, but I use Ubuntu on top of that. 

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was very quick. It is easy to install. 

What about the implementation team?

I implemented myself. 

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I'm aware of the paid services that they offer and provide technical support for, which are very good. Down the road, I will use some of them, specifically the service that automatically patches the central core of the operating system because it seems useful. Another service they used to have is a paid networking service. The services they offer are useful, but they depend on your particular situation and requirements. I would consider paying for them when a situation calls for them, but I don't need them right now. 

You don't need to pay for licensing. 

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Some of my colleagues use Mint, but it's a matter of preference and specific to each person. 

What other advice do I have?

I recommend Ubuntu Linux, specifically for developers. 

I would rate Ubuntu Linux a nine out of ten. 

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Flag as inappropriate
IT Manager at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 5
Easy to use and comes with many available packages
Pros and Cons
  • "The feature that I most like in Ubuntu is that it is really easy to use. Ubuntu is very easy to use and comes with many available packages. I think that Ubuntu is a good solution for the small business or a small lab."
  • "I would recommend they improve the network security, because it can be very difficult. I mentioned that when you upgrade Ubuntu, the network cut is always deactivated, so you have to restart the service to reactivate the network. It is important to improve this ability."

What is most valuable?

The feature that I most like in Ubuntu is that it is really easy to use. Ubuntu is very easy to use and comes with many available packages. I think that Ubuntu is a good solution for the small business or a small lab, like ours. We have a different database, more applications, and more solutions, and it's not so difficult to use Ubuntu for that.

What needs improvement?

it sometimes happens that when you upgrade, the network card deactivates.
the "Network-manager" network service must be restarted to allow the server to be able to reconnect to the network. this is a situation that I have experienced several times.
Therefore if it is a novice it could be compromising for him.
I think it would be important to improve this so that the network service or even any other service is not stopped after an upgrade.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using Ubuntu Linux for eight to ten years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We are three senior engineers and four junior engineer doing the maintenance.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

In terms of scalability, Ubuntu allows us to implement the necessary scalability. But in our solution, we don't need scalability. But it is possible to implement the solution in Ubuntu and I think it permits scalability.

I have tried to do the scalability by using the future machine to implement the scalability solution, but at this time we don't use it in our solution in the lab because you have many people with commercial access. For this kind of use, normally it is on our server for our solution but it's possible to implement a scalability solution with high availability, also.

How are customer service and technical support?

I never contacted customer support. Maybe in the future I will contact Ubuntu technical support. For now, when we have a problem, we try to go to the community on different discussion forums to solve our different problems.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is easy, it's not complex.

It does not take a long time. The installation of Ubuntu takes maybe 30 to 40 minutes for only its installation and not to deploy our additional software solution.

What other advice do I have?

What I can advise is that Ubuntu is a good solution for different environments, such as one server, but it will be important for them to estimate their scalability solution. If there are many people with access to the server, we know there will be load implementation of the server and you can use Ubuntu here. Ubuntu is easy to use and has a big community for the back-end that can help with the deployment of the solution.

On a scale of one to ten, I would rate Ubuntu Linux a nine.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Solution Architect / Head of DevOps Engineer at a tech services company with 201-500 employees
Real User
Top 5
User-friendly, easy to use, and open-source
Pros and Cons
  • "The solution is free to use."
  • "The product could be easier to manage."

What is our primary use case?

Ubuntu is a Linux OS. The solution is primarily used for web servers and web traffic.

What is most valuable?

The solution is easy to use for developers and DevOps teams. 

The commands and user commands are very good. 

The repository and the security repository are up to date, which is great.

The product is very user-friendly.

We've found the solution to be quite stable so far.

The solution is free to use.

There is a very good open-source community surrounding the solution that can help you troubleshoot if you run into any issues. 

What needs improvement?

You need a Linux operating system to be the host of the web servers. We don't use a GUI. It's not like Windows. It's not for daily users to write documents or browsing sheets or browsing the internet.

The product could be easier to manage.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using the solution for five or six years at this point.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability of the solution is very good. It doesn't crash or freeze. There are no bugs or glitches. It's reliable. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The solution can scale if you need it to.

How are customer service and technical support?

We don't really deal with technical support per see. It's a free-to-use open-source solution. The way it works is it has a community and you can submit to Ubuntu and you can get help from some of the people that lead this community. It's pretty good. You can find what you need to solve pretty much any problem you might have.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I've also used CentOS, and I would recommend Unbuntu over it.

How was the initial setup?

I did not install the solution myself, however, if you decide to use the cloud you can choose it as a wizard. It's my understanding that it is pretty straightforward. 

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The solution is free to use. It doesn't cost us anything. It's great that we have access without having to worry about licensing fees.

What other advice do I have?

We don't use a GUI. We tend to focus on its OS layers. Therefore, we don't really deal with any dashboards.

I'd rate the solution at a perfect ten out of ten. It's been very reliable and we appreciate its capabilities overall.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Flag as inappropriate