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PostgreSQL OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

PostgreSQL is #3 ranked solution in top Open Source Databases. IT Central Station users give PostgreSQL an average rating of 8 out of 10. PostgreSQL is most commonly compared to Firebird SQL:PostgreSQL vs Firebird SQL. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a comms service provider, accounting for 38% of all views.
What is PostgreSQL?

PostgreSQL is a powerful and fully-featured database management system with which business owners can create object relational tables. It is an open source project that can be acquired for free and heavily focuses on elements such as extensibility and strict standard compliance. PostgreSQL is a flexible server system that can manage large workloads that are being contributed and accessed from a wide range of locations such as in a network, as well as small-scale projects like a single machine or user.

Some technical details of interest about PostgreSQL include:

  • Its MVCC (Multi-inversion concurrency control) allows fluid changes to be made to the system without cumbersome roadblocks, while maintaining the optimal level of ACID.
  • Replication, built-in binary replication is available from the 9.0 version and later.
  • It offers a wide range of indexing capabilities, including B-tree and hash indexes, as well as GIN and GiST (generalized inverted indexes and generalized search trees).
  • It uses procedural languages that make it easier for developers to expand the database.
PostgreSQL Buyer's Guide

Download the PostgreSQL Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: November 2021

PostgreSQL Customers

Hundreds of companies have used PostgreSQL, including the University of Alabama, Birmingham, Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, Champion Products, the United Nations Industrial Development Organization, the U.S. Agency for Disease Control and Prevention, and IMDB.com.

Pricing Advice

What users are saying about PostgreSQL pricing:
  • "It is also open-source so it is free."
  • "PostgreSQL is open-source, so if capable admins are available then the setup cost can be $0."
  • "It is open source. There is no licensing."

PostgreSQL Reviews

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Jason Tumusiime
Software Developer at a healthcare company with 1-10 employees
Real User
Top 20
Can be clustered which allows for fault tolerance

Pros and Cons

  • "Clustering will be the number 1 feature. It is also open-source so it is free. It can also be clustered, to allow fault tolerance."
  • "It could be improved by using parallelization. You want basically, distributed computing."

What is our primary use case?

Currently, I'm doing a lot of source applications with Ruby on Rails, React, and mobile applications. PostgreSQL is my preferred database over MySQL. It's open-source and licenses are free, so it is excellent. The SQL queries are almost the same as MySQL.

What is most valuable?

Clustering is the number one feature. It is also open-source so it is free. It can also be clustered, to allow fault tolerance. MySQL has to be licensed, but PostgreSQL does all the same things. I have deployed both. You benefit from the way you use it. 

What needs improvement?

It could be improved by using parallelization. We want distributed computing. Some databases handle huge volumes of data better, such as the NoSQL database, MongoDB which can handle 100 000, or a million people using the same data search. PostgreSQL is going to take longer to do this, but it is more structured, and unlike MongoDB data is less likely to be duplicated. Large volumes of data can be handled better in PostgreSQL if the queries are written well.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using PostgreSQL for about 2 years. I used to use version 9, about two years ago but right now I'm using version 10 or 12. I know how to create database functions. I know how to create relationships between data like primary keys and foreign keys etc.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I think PostgreSQL is more stable than MySQL.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

As an RDBMS, a relational database management system, it scales well.

How are customer service and technical support?

I have mainly used the Stack Overflow site for support, which is not technical support in particular. I have never been in a situation whereby I'm stuck and I have to go and ask PostgreSQL support.

How was the initial setup?

The difficulty of the initial setup depends on the application you are deploying the code to. It can be integrated with Docker to enable automation of this process. I put PostgreSQL in a Docker container and then I just collect it. It just works wherever I deploy it. It takes less than three minutes. I use a continuous integration process. The Docker orchestration engine such as Kubernetes or Docker Swarm can be used to integrate with it. I store the code in GitHub or GitLab and your code is always there. Depending on the technology you're using, some things change in your configuration.

What about the implementation team?

I have deployed them to Oracle recently. I've also deployed it in the cloud. There's really nothing special about the cloud, as long as I use the PostgreSQL machine I can deploy it anywhere. I want to deploy it on the Google cloud platform, and Amazon Web Services as these are well known virtual machines.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

When it comes to pros, I would put MySQL and PostgreSQL in the same class. let's say I'm trying to write to the database and then the power went off. It will still keep the data integral. I don't have duplicated data, and data integrity is intact. With NoSQL databases I have to duplicate queries in case something like this happens I don't know whether my data is going to be integral in cases like a failure situation. PostgreSQL has the rollback function which remains integral. I cannot build a search engine using PostgreSQL, because that would be a very expensive hit on resources. Alternatively, with the ElasticSearch utility, and the use of load balancing, it is very easy to use. Elasticsearch returns substantial results and works in the background. I cannot do that with MySQL or PostgreSQL databases as that's actually a very expensive use of resources.

What other advice do I have?

My advice would be to use PostgreSQL instead of MySQL because of licensing issues. Another reason is that Oracle may remove MySQL soon or add substantial costs to using it It may even turn into something like MariaDB, and then you would need to know if MariaDB and MySQL work the same? PostgreSQL really works well. There are a lot of other databases around right now, but PostgreSQL is the most popular. It is not like a hammer and a nail situation whereby it is the only thing you have to use. If you need a relational database management system, go for PostgreSQL instead of MariaDB or MySQL, then use it side to side. Can also consider other engines out there, like other NoSQL engines, perhaps. 

I would give it an 8 out of 10. PostgreSQL is not suitable for all types of applications, hence why I gave it an 8 instead of a 10.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Hybrid Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Amazon Web Services (AWS)
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
PG
Subdirector - Digital Products and Services at a media company with 501-1,000 employees
Real User
Top 20
A stable solution with an easy setup for media management

Pros and Cons

  • "The solution provides complete support in terms of the SQL dialect and behaves nicely when it comes to transactions."
  • "A better graphic user-interface would be nice to see."

What is our primary use case?

We use the solution for media purposes. We manage the sites of one of the largest sports business papers and multiple TV channels. So, we develop the websites.

What is most valuable?

We are increasingly using their support for JSON, which we find to be very complete, something I made use of in the past. The solution provides complete support in terms of the SQL dialect and behaves nicely when it comes to transactions. One can change the database structure transactionally. This is one of the few databases that allows this. I like it. 

The solution is comparable in sophistication with that of Oracle. Each product has a few things less and more than the other. We also like that the solution is open source. We have good performance with a small footprint. It's rather nice. It's very robust.

What needs improvement?

The solution could be improved through an upgrade to the latest version. 

A better graphic user-interface would be nice to see. 

There is nothing I particularly dislike about the solution. The data propagation in master-slave configurations would be a good example. This is one of the features that I understood the least, yet we have it working and use it to propagate from the content management system database to the multiple publishing databases. 

This said, I would like this propagation feature to be simplified for new users and to come with better explanation. However, I will refrain from giving criticism on this point, as I do not know if they already handled this in the last version. Overall, I have only praise for the solution.

I cannot point to anything in particular that we are missing out on at the moment. What comes to mind are features that I have yet to try, although I don't  have any wish lists for PostgreSQL at the moment. I don't know how it stacks up when it comes to the importing and exporting of data. For databases involving this, we just make use of Redshift, which is verified from PostgreSQL and developed by Amazon. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using PostgreSQL for a couple of years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The solution is very stable. We have databases that have been running for years.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have scaled the solution just to three slave machines, but it works well when it comes to master and slave. 

How are customer service and technical support?

Mostly, support consists of the community and there are several consultancies, should the need arise, although we have never had use of these. There have been no issues on this end. Community support has always been sufficient for us. 

How was the initial setup?

On a single machine, the initial setup is extremely easy. I also find configuration to be very simple. It is similar to MySQL in that a person must know what he wants when it comes to setting up the solution, in which certain features would come into play. Setting it up in a different way will involve the use of multiple search engines. 

With the solution, one installs it and whatever he tunes is optional. Of course, he would have to play with the configurations if he wishes to have specific personality, such as cluster configurations, or tuning for very demanding performance. Overall, for small things or development, one need only install it, start it and it's done. 

While the length of the deployment varies with the configuration, a simple one will take a couple of minutes. 

What other advice do I have?

We deploy the solution both on-premises and on AWS. 

I had my doubts about the functionality before joining this company, as it seemed very complex. It turns out that the solution is actually very simple to set up and we have it working all the time without any problems. It survives the network partitions, so we like this very much. 

My advice is that a person just try it and use it. For me, it beats out JSON and is superior to MongoDB. It works in a completely different way. But, overall, I would rather use PostgreSQL when it comes to starting and manipulating JSON and it boasts superior integrity and performance. Of course, there are specific things that MongoDB does differently. A person's mileage may vary, depending on what he wishes to accomplish. 

I rate PostgreSQL as a nine out of ten and I choose to knock it down a point only because it could use a better graphic user-interface. 

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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Learn what your peers think about PostgreSQL. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2021.
552,695 professionals have used our research since 2012.
NP
System Architect at a university with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Lightweight, easy to deploy, and scalable for particular projects

Pros and Cons

  • "Postgres is rock solid when deployed according to best practices as documented by the PostgreSQL community. When it's installed correctly, PostgreSQL is an enterprise-grade solution."
  • "I'd like to see better memory management. I think that that's one of the few areas that Postgres does not handle as well as MySQL does or did."

What is our primary use case?

We deploy our databases in either a local cloud or AWS. For the locally deployed database, we have our own private cloud consisting of a couple of different data centers that we partner with. For everything else, we use Oracle or Microsoft SQL. On the Microsoft SQL side, that's not usually software as a service. It's generally done as a local installation on a virtual machine. If we're doing a deployment on an AWS environment, we use the AWS Postgres database. It's slightly different than doing the installation yourself. So if you're doing the PostgreSQL installation on a Linux environment, that's usually when we're using that directly from postgresql.org. 

What is most valuable?

It's an open-source database, so we can see the code used for that database. Also, we use it because it's lightweight, easy to deploy, and scalable for particular projects, especially if we're dealing with something that requires a Docker deployment.

What needs improvement?

I'd like to see better memory management. I think that that's one of the few areas that Postgres does not handle as well as MySQL does or did. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I've used PostgreSQL off and on for different projects for probably about 20 years now.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Postgres' stability is wholly dependent on the skill and knowledge of the administrator who deployed it. Postgres is rock solid when deployed according to best practices as documented by the PostgreSQL community. When it's installed correctly, PostgreSQL is an enterprise-grade solution. It's reliable but requires more familiarity than you would necessarily need with a database like Oracle or Microsoft SQL out of the box.

How are customer service and support?

The biggest shortcoming of Postgres and most open-source applications is support and documentation. There's usually a decent amount of technical documentation. That would be for someone that works exclusively within the database. But it would be helpful to have more documentation at the DevOps level so developers have a better idea of maintaining the database's performance without necessarily requiring a developer who specializes in that database. A lot of DevOps people are much more interested in writing their code for the databases to work. And sometimes, they end up devoting more time to database tuning than is necessary for an application developer. So documentation in that area would probably be best.

How was the initial setup?

So back in late August, the developers released PostgreSQL 14, the most feature-rich deployment to date. And they did a reasonably decent write-up about the new and unique features. What I found most interesting is that you can use a straight-up Windows installer for the PostgreSQL database. And it includes all the components of the stack you need, so you don't necessarily need to know how to install its different parts. For example, suppose you're going to install it for Solaris, BSD, or Linux. So when you're installing in those three environments, it's usually packaged and requires secondary packages. And some of these packages are version dependent, so it can get complicated pretty quickly. If you are curious about how PostgreSQL databases run, I suggest you try it out on Windows first.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We use PostgreSQL alongside Microsoft and Oracle solutions. Postgre is suitable for scaling with specific projects. But while it scales very well, Postgre doesn't have the same recovery features as some larger-scale databases. For example, you can run Oracle Databases in a couple of different ways for easy recoverability should the primary database fail. First, you've got a rack for redundancy and load distribution. Second, Oracle has a feature called Data Guard that replicates the database in case it goes down. Data Guard allows you to run a completely different copy of the database that will take our main exports and keep it up to date. So if your primary database has a software or hardware failure, you can bring up the secondary database and re-task your applications to use that database. It's not as simple to do this with Postgres. 

What other advice do I have?

I rate PostgreSQL eight out of 10. 

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Private Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Other
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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Kaan Çelik
Data Analytics and Business Intelligence Manager at a computer software company with 201-500 employees
Real User
Top 5
Easy to use, flexible and stable

Pros and Cons

  • "The product is quite flexible."
  • "The pricing could be better."

What is our primary use case?

The database is used for our customers' products. We also offer some products on our POC system, and our customer's POC systems post some data stored on PostgreSQL on the cloud. Our company's data doesn't store at PostgreSQL. We still have our system MS SQL and Oracle.

What is most valuable?

The solution is very easy to use. You don't have to be extremely knowledgeable or technical to take advantage of it.

The product is quite flexible. 

We find it to be one of the cheapest options on the market. It's not expensive to use. 

What needs improvement?

The pricing could be better.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've used the solution for ten years at this point. It may even be longer.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The solution is quite stable. We haven't had any issues with it. We haven't experienced bugs or glitches. It's reliable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The solution is scalable. We've made some upgrades on our system, and it was so easy to do for the actual upgrades. In terms of the database itself, we haven't really had any issues with it.

How are customer service and technical support?

I don't have any experience with technical support. Other teams in our company end up handling that. I can't speak to their knowledgeability or responsiveness having never worked with them.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I don't recall us using a different product.

How was the initial setup?

In terms of the initial setup, we generally use the cloud system. The cloud system is very easy to set up these days. If you choose some with pre-installment, you trigger the system, and it's pretty automatic. You don't need a lot of things configured. After that, after you start to use it, you can tune it as you like. We made some adjustments on the system - such as additional storage or additional RAM or other resources - and we were able to add those in very easily.

The production system we use for reporting is a read-only system. Due to this, if we use the production system for reporting or other kinds of big data, the system can be slow on the customer side. However, Postgres can still service all the tasks which we need.

We haven't needed too many people to handle deployment and maintenance. There's been around ten or so that have been on it.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The pricing is reasonable. Of course, our economy has been hurt a little due to COVID-19. The pandemic has affected a lot of us. It's been hard for the companies that sell services with a database cost. You really have to choose the lowest-priced options right now. Postgres offers a fair price on the market, currently. That said, it could be less expensive, especially right now.

We definitely plan to continue to use the solution in the future. It's been quite good for us.

That said, I'm not in the financial department and I don't know the exact cost of the solution.

What other advice do I have?

We're just customers and end-users.

We generally use the last version, as we try to ensure all of our programs are the latest technology. Therefore, we generally use cloud platforms like Amazon or Microsoft, which is Azure. Whichever version is on the cloud, we generally use that version.

That said, some of it is on the cloud and some of it is on-premise. In Turkey, we have some legal requirements that require some data to be stored in our country. We have to store it locally. Therefore, we can't use the cloud completely.

I'd recommend the solution to other organizations.

I would rate the product at an eight out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Faustine Chisasa
Engineering Supervisor- Corporate Data Solutions and Services at TZ Telecoms. Corporation
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
Easy to manage, good integration, improves performance, and saves on storage space

Pros and Cons

  • "We managed to reduce the storage space needed to 10% of the original size, without affecting data integrity, and we significantly improved the performance."
  • "PostgreSQL uses high memory compared to its counterparts when a highly demanding load is involved, especially one that makes many concurrent connections to the database."

What is our primary use case?

I use PostgreSQL on-premises to store monitoring data collected by the Zabbix Server.

I wanted a database engine that could handle an ingress of a thousand real-time values per second, delete old items without affecting performance, and handle hundreds of user requests at all times.

The solution had to support high compression and time series data while maintaining data integrity and performance.

I wanted the database engine to be easy to tune, secure, and set up.

PostgreSQL has regular updates and plenty of official and community resources.

How has it helped my organization?

PostgreSQL greatly improved our monitoring solutions data storage, performance, compression, and processing. Our monitoring solutions run efficiently with little maintenance.

The availability, stability, and reliability of our monitoring solutions greatly improved because the database engine scales out well, is easy to tune, easy to upgrade and manage, and supports extensions and plugins for specific use cases. One such plugin is TimescaleDB and it has proved greatly beneficial for time-series data storage and automatic partitioning of the database.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is support for the Timescale DB extension. We managed to reduce the storage space needed to 10% of the original size, without affecting data integrity, and we significantly improved the performance.

The database engine is easy to manage, the tuning is friendly, and the integration with supported extensions is friendly too.

The database engine is open-source, too. Since we did everything internally, it has greatly reduced the costs of setting up our systems.

It also supports diverse kinds of replication, which is crucial for a high availability environment that we plan to set in the near future.

What needs improvement?

PostgreSQL uses high memory compared to its counterparts when a highly demanding load is involved, especially one that makes many concurrent connections to the database. 

Like many other databases, the tuning is manual through a configuration file. It would be useful if the database engine could detect the specifications of the machine in which it is installed and so bring some levels of auto-tuning. 

PostgreSQL replication support isn't so straightforward for multi-sources and master replicas. It will be great if native support of those replication modes become available in the future.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using PostgreSQL for one year.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Stability-wise, I have a great impression.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It seems to be scalable.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I used other database management systems (MySQL and its variant MariaDB) for my NMS applications before moving to PostgreSQL. I had some optimization issues on MySQL and MariaDB and decided to switch to PostgreSQL, mainly for the TimescaleDB extension support provided on PostgreSQL and which my application natively support including automatic database partitioning. TimescaleDB proved to be helpful since I mostly deal with time series data and the TimescaleDB hypertables improved my applications perfomance greatly.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was straightforward, although it needed time to get everything well-tuned. 

What about the implementation team?

I implemented in-house.

What was our ROI?

The ROI is 100%.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

PostgreSQL is open-source, so if capable admins are available then the setup cost can be $0. We use internal resources, so it was completely free for us.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I evaluated other options including MySQL and its variant MariaDB & Percona Server for MySQL, Oracle DB, and SQLite.

What other advice do I have?

For anybody who is considering this solution, my advice is that it is better to do enough research on the specific database engine requirements.

I highly recommend PostgreSQL with TimescaleDB extension for time-series data.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
MS
Head of Technical Support at a real estate/law firm with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
Free to use, stable, and quick to set up

Pros and Cons

  • "The product is very similar to the SQL Server."
  • "I'm not really able to customize it."

What is our primary use case?

We use it for processing files mostly. It integrates basically with the SQL Server. On the server-side it uses the SQL Server, then from the files that are generated from SQL Server we do have an application running using Microsoft, and we attach it to a Postgres server. We do is for the backups there from time to time.

What is most valuable?

Overall, the solution is very good. 

The solution is free to use.

It is easy to use and quite stable. It's as robust as Oracle, however, SQL Server is easier to use I think.

The product is very similar to the SQL Server. 

The installation is quite fast.

What needs improvement?

If you look at overall PostgreSQL, it could be easier to use.

I'm not yet able to use all of the features on the product at this time. 

I'm not really able to customize it.

The integration could be easier. SQL Server has an easier integration process, for example, as a comparison.

With Postgres, you can run it in Windows Server, however, there are other things that you have to run.

The product is more for technical people. For example, SQL Server is for anybody. Even newer users can just pick it up and learn from it and mess with it and run it. You can't do that with PostgreSQL. It has more of a learning curve. YOu need more training and documentation.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using the solution for about five years. We've used it for a while, however, it is only on a few workstations.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The solution is very good and very stable. There are no bugs or glitches. it doesn't crash or freeze. It's reliable. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

There are only a couple of users at this time as we restrict it only to local implementations. Per store, we do have certain applications that use it. 

How are customer service and technical support?

We haven't reached out to techncial support. As with Linux, if you want tech support then you have to pay a subscription for it. The free version is, with what we have here, working well and we haven't had problems.

I have only a couple of people helping me with regards to the tech support, internally. That's why we spend a lot of time focusing more on the SQL Server and the Microsoft products.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We did not previously use other products. 

I've also used Oracle and Microsoft SQL. This product is free and more robust than Oracle, however, Microsoft SQL might be easier to use.

How was the initial setup?

The installation is pretty quick. It's not hard to set up. I wouldn't describe it as a complex process. 

We only have a couple of people on staff that can handle deployment and maintenance. 

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The product is free. You don't have to pay a license fee. 

What other advice do I have?

The last one that we used is version 11 or something like that. I'm not sure if that's the latest version or not.

Postgres is similar to Linux. It's designed for people who would know what they want, who would have to set up what they need, and they would use it, and they know that it's straightforward, so that other people cannot just go in and mess with it.

I'd rate the product as a nine out of ten.

I'd recommend the solution to other users. 

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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NK
Senior IT Manager at a pharma/biotech company with 501-1,000 employees
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
Scales well and offers a quick and easy setup

Pros and Cons

  • "The initial setup is quick and easy."
  • "It would be great if the solution offered even more integration capabilities."

What is our primary use case?

Typically, our team runs the database and then the applications, on Postgres. However, I'm not part of the development process.

What is most valuable?

The solution is quite stable and very reliable.

On the cloud side of the product, the solution scales quite well.

The initial setup is quick and easy.

What needs improvement?

I don't work directly on development, however, I haven't heard of any complaints from the development team in general. I can't speak to any features that may be missing. Our team seems quite satisfied with it overall.

It would be great if the solution offered even more integration capabilities.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using the solution for the past two or three years at this point.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability, overall, has been good. I have not heard of issues with bugs or glitches. I cannot recall it crashing or freezing. Its performance has been reliable.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The product can scale well. However, this is mostly the case on the cloud, which more easily can scale as there are no physical limitations to hold a company back. If a company needs to scale using this solution, it can do so with relative ease, specifically if they use a cloud deployment.

We only have about ten to 15 or so users on the solution right now. On the products we produce there may be more, however, that varies. There could be a hundred or so users.

We have plans to continue to use the solution going forward.

How are customer service and technical support?

We don't really use technical support too often. We have our own team that we can turn to, and they can handle most, if not all, issues.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We've used a few other products previously. We're also using MongoDB, or at least, we will be, in an application that we've just started.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is not complex at all. I would describe it as straightforward and rather simple. 

The deployment is quick as well. It might have taken us about 45 minutes to an hour or so to get everything up and running. It's great.

We have a technical team or two or three people that can manage the deployment and maintenance. You don't need a big team.

What about the implementation team?

We handled the implementation process ourselves. We didn't need the assistance of any consultants or integrators. It was pretty straightforward, and therefore we didn't need the extra help.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The product is a direct service, and it is free to use. There isn't a licensing fee.

What other advice do I have?

We are simply a customer and end-user. We don't have a business relationship with PostgreSQL.

The solution is deployed both on the cloud and on-premises. We use more than one deployment model.

I can't recall the exact version number we are using, however, it's my understanding that it is not necessarily the latest version.

I'd recommend this product to other organizations. It's worked well for us so far.

In general, I would rate the solution at an eight out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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SP
IT Systems Administrator at a transportation company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 5
Comprehensive, integrates well, and does what it is supposed to do

Pros and Cons

  • "It is a pretty comprehensive database system. Its performance is good, and it does what it is supposed to do. It also integrates very well."
  • "There are some products out there that have a slightly different method of implementation for the SQL language. Some of those are slightly better in some areas, and PostgreSQL is slightly better in some areas. I would probably like to match all of those products together. It is just down to the functionality. For example, Oracle has a number of options within SQL that are outside of what you would class as the SQL standard. PostgreSQL misses some of those, but PostgreSQL does other things that are better than what Oracle does. I would like to merge those two products so that there is a certain amount of functionality in a single product."

What is our primary use case?

We use it as a backend for some vendor-supplied tools and products. We also do a certain amount of software development, and we use it as the database platform behind our own software.

We have a number of deployments, and the version number very much depends on the vendor software requirements. We have on-premises and cloud deployments.

What is most valuable?

It is a pretty comprehensive database system. Its performance is good, and it does what it is supposed to do. It also integrates very well.

What needs improvement?

There are some products out there that have a slightly different method of implementation for the SQL language. Some of those are slightly better in some areas, and PostgreSQL is slightly better in some areas. I would probably like to match all of those products together. It is just down to the functionality. For example, Oracle has a number of options within SQL that are outside of what you would class as the SQL standard. PostgreSQL misses some of those, but PostgreSQL does other things that are better than what Oracle does. I would like to merge those two products so that there is a certain amount of functionality in a single product.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using it probably for two years.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

In terms of the number of users, the users on PostgreSQL itself are probably application-level users, so you may only find two or three accounts per instance, but the application-level users can easily go up to 300.

How are customer service and technical support?

We use the open-source product. We don't take it from any given supplier. So, we haven't got any tech support.

The tech support primarily is me. I am a systems administrator, and I do database administration as well. If we need any further in-depth support, depending on which product is sitting on top of that database, we will go to the vendor, but like most IT teams, we would admit that Google is your best friend.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We were using Sybase. We've actually transitioned most of it over to PostgreSQL.

How was the initial setup?

It is easy to install. The deployment duration depends on what you're deploying. If you just want a database, I can have a PostgreSQL database installed and deployed in probably about 20 minutes. If you're looking for clustering or failover and mirroring, that would obviously impact the time, but it doesn't take a significant amount of time.

What about the implementation team?

I deploy it myself.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

It is open source. There is no licensing.

What other advice do I have?

It is a very good RDBMS, and I'm quite happy with it. It does what it says, and it does it fairly well. I've seen some bits that are stronger in other products and some bits that are weaker in other products. My recommendation would depend on the requirements and the use cases.

I would rate PostgreSQL a nine out of 10. It does its job adequately, and I am quite happy with what it does at the moment. You wouldn't hear a 10 from me for any database vendor at the moment.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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