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COO at a tech vendor with 1-10 employees
Real User
Top 20
Cost-effective, good performance, easy to use, and the cross-platform capabilities are nice
Pros and Cons
  • "What I've been most pleased with is the cost point, performance, and ease of use."
  • "The analytics features are in need of improvement."

What is our primary use case?

The primary use case is as a reporting solution, data collection, data manipulation, and similar tasks. We install MySQL on Linux and Windows machines for testing our enterprise application.

We are a solution provider and this product is part of our offering to our clients.

How has it helped my organization?

MySQL hasn't really affected our organization, specifically because we primarily use it in a consulting model.

What is most valuable?

All of the databases basically have the same set of features.

What I've been most pleased with is the cost point, performance, and ease of use.

It is very easy to configure, it's easy to deploy, and it's cross-platform capabilities are quite nice.

What needs improvement?

The analytics features are in need of improvement. They aren't as far along as the capabilities that you have in terms of analytics for SQL Server and Oracle.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using MySQL for about five years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I've had no problems with stability and its recovery processing, error processing, and things along those lines have been fine.  We always use Java applications and the JDBC drivers work fine.

I haven't had any issues at all with its reporting or its transaction processing, or anything else. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

For our use-cases, the scalability is fine. We haven't seen any issues and we're processing probably hundreds of millions of rows each day. We're not into the billions or tens of billions, so we're probably a medium-to-low use case.

Most of our instances are single-instance databases, so I haven't had to deal with its clustering capabilities or distributed database feature set.

Our clients vary in size, although we generally operate as a small system inside a major organization.

How are customer service and technical support?

I have never had to utilize technical support. There was never an issue that I had to call in.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I use a lot of databases including MySQL, Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle, and PostgreSQL. 

The performance of SQL Server and Oracle is better than MySQL. The two alternatives have other features, as well.

How was the initial setup?

The initial set up very straightforward. MySQL is easy to deploy and very easy to configure. We can literally bring up instances in minutes.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

This product has a good price point.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We had been on SQL Server and Oracle, and a subset of our customers wanted us to switch and use MySQL. We explored what that transition would take and then implemented it.

What other advice do I have?

My advice for anybody who is looking into implementing MySQL is to start by carefully evaluating their use cases. One of the things that we found is that MySQL didn't necessarily have all of the flexibility for JSON and XML processing at the time. I know that they've improved it, although it's not quite the same as what you see specifically in Oracle. So, the customer has to evaluate that. For straight-on basic transaction processing, it's worked out just as well with few issues from SQL Server to MySQL or from Oracle to MySQL.

For my use, I'm fine with what they have. I'll be interested in what they'll provide in analytics, as well as JSON and XML processing if that's even on their roadmap. For right now, it's really not an impact on my use case.

If I were rating SQL Server or Oracle then I would rate either one a nine out of ten. The only difference is that they do perform better than MySQL, although they don't perform so much better than it's relevant.

I would rate this solution an eight out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Data Solution Architect at a comms service provider with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
Free and easy to use but needs better backup functionality
Pros and Cons
  • "The solution has been very easy to scale so far."
  • "The backup methods need improvement."

What is our primary use case?

We are primarily using it as a database for our products. For internally built systems, we have MySQL. We use it internally.

What is most valuable?

It's our database due to the fact that it's cheaper and is actually free to use.

The product is very easy to use, yes.

It's quite stable.

The solution is very compatible with many versions of Linux. Most of Linux is free, so it's easy to implement with MySQL. Whether it's Ubuntu, CentOS, or different types of Linux, it's the same across other operating systems, and therefore it's very easy to use and compatible with any demand that comes from developers. At the end of the day, MySQL is compatible with most of the platforms.

The solution has been very easy to scale so far.

The installation process is very easy.

What needs improvement?

The backup methods need improvement. MySQL needs to improve its backup methods so that you can actually do a backup without affecting products. Currently, when you're doing your backup, it locks the database. When someone tries to access it during a backup, it fails to read or to update. They can improve on the backup and all the backup features in general.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using the solution for more than five years at this point. It may be as much as seven years or so.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The solution is very stable. There are no bugs or glitches. It doesn't crash or freeze. It's reliable in terms of performance.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The solution is very scalable. If you want to install it in the machine and scale that machine, you can do so. Or you add more machine nodes whereby you are actually clustering items and you're clustering your database within one site. The solution will actually extend these needs to another site for replication, DR replication.

We have about 20 people using the solution currently.

We do plan to continue to use the solution in the future.

How are customer service and technical support?

All of our support is internal. We haven't subscribed to outside technical support.

That said, we haven't had any issues with the solution that would require support assistance either.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is not complex at all. It is very easy to install as most of the Linux comes embedded so that even if you're under a different administrator, you should be able to just click and install.

Installation doesn't take more than 10 minutes for me. It might take up to 30 minutes or an hour for someone who is new. However, for someone who is used to MySQL, doesn't take more than 10 minutes to set up.

For deployment and maintenance, basically, we would need about three engineers. The one that actually does the hardware infrastructure, the one that does the operating system, and then the one that actually does the MySQL, which is the database administrator.

What about the implementation team?

I handled the implementation myself. I did not need the assistance of integrators or consultants. 

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The solution is absolutely free to use. It's one of the reasons we've chosen it.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We do evaluate other solutions. We also use other products, such as Oracle's SQL server.

When a trace comes for MySQL, we will check mostly the cost of installation and the cost for maintaining everything. We are choosing MySQL over the others that are actually licensed solutions mostly due to the fact that MySQL is free.

What other advice do I have?

We are just customers and end-users. We don't have a business relationship with MySQL.

I'd recommend the solution to other organizations.

I would rate it at a seven out of ten overall. 

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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CCO at a construction company with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 5
Easy to use with a straightforward setup but requires better replication
Pros and Cons
  • "The solution is very simple. It's easy to use. That's the most important feature."
  • "The replication needs improvement. It's becoming a native cloud product like Oracle DB or Cockroach DB."

What is our primary use case?

We primarily use the solution for the many small applications we use. However, we do not use it with our enterprise-level applications.

What is most valuable?

The solution is very simple. It's easy to use. That's the most important feature. 

We do have it supported by various programs we run with it.

What needs improvement?

The replication needs improvement. It's becoming a native cloud product like Oracle DB or Cockroach DB.

For how long have I used the solution?

We started using MySQL in various products about 10 years ago when it was still an independent community product.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The solution has proven to be quite stable. We haven't experienced any bugs or glitches.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

According to our experience, it's not really an enterprise tool that you can easily expand and scale the way you can with, for example, Oracle. It's good for small to medium-sized applications. It is not ideal for very big applications.

We have a data center that uses the application and it isn't very heavy on traffic. It basically runs on its own. We only use it occasionally. It's like a co-operation management system.

We do plan to increase usage, but we plan on looking at different databases. We're in the process of researching how scaling up would work. Chances are, we'll need to move to a different platform.

How are customer service and technical support?

We've never been in touch with technical support. For us, so far, things have been working perfectly so there hasn't been a need to.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

This is the first solution we've used. We don't use any other product. It's very popular with the in-house program, as we advised them to stick with this application.

How was the initial setup?

We've used the solution for ten years and the setup hasn't changed much over time. It is, more or less, simple when you compare it to other databases. 

Deployment takes less than an hour.

It only takes one person to maintain the solution. The individual doesn't have to be an engineer. They just need to be a support person.

What about the implementation team?

We don't need a consultant for the implementation. This is used by someone in our company that uses databases and has an average knowledge of the product. We don't even need a vendor. We can handle setup ourselves at this point. It's not like Oracle or other products that can be quite complicated.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We use the community edition of the solution.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We didn't evaluate anything before choosing this solution. However, there are a few new products coming up that are growing in popularity and we will need to research them. Products like the Cockroach DB, Nuo DB, etc. are on our radar to be evaluated in the future.

What other advice do I have?

The most important thing other potential users need to do is to look at the use cases for this application and to evaluate how it's able to handle heavy loads, etc. Users should evaluate how it handles high-traffic. They'll need to ask themselves: is the solution usable for my applications? 

I'd rate the solution seven out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Principal Software Engineer at a manufacturing company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Free, stable, and full-featured
Pros and Cons
  • "It is free, which is probably its most valuable feature. It is a pretty full-featured relational database. It really does everything we need it to do."
  • "The availability of tools could be improved in the MySQL open-source platform. They can provide more analytical tools. I haven't had any particularly difficult issues to troubleshoot on MySQL, but in the past, on Microsoft SQL Server, I had to troubleshoot some difficult issues, and better tools were in place to see what was going on in real-time on the server. So, that's the bit that is lacking on the MySQL open-source platform."

What is our primary use case?

We're on a software development team. We develop applications.

We're currently running version 5.7 of MySQL, and we are going to be upgrading to version 8 this year.

MySQL server currently is in a co-location center. We've got a hosting provider that takes care of that for us. We are looking at moving it into AWS, but that won't happen this year. We do have a smaller MySQL RDS instance in AWS right now, but it is pretty minimal. 

What is most valuable?

It is free, which is probably its most valuable feature. It is a pretty full-featured relational database. It really does everything we need it to do. 

What needs improvement?

The availability of tools could be improved in the MySQL open-source platform. They can provide more analytical tools. I haven't had any particularly difficult issues to troubleshoot on MySQL, but in the past, on Microsoft SQL Server, I had to troubleshoot some difficult issues, and better tools were in place to see what was going on in real-time on the server. So, that's the bit that is lacking on the MySQL open-source platform.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using MySQL for seven years in my current company, and I have probably used it for another two or three years in a previous company.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It is very stable.

How are customer service and support?

I haven't dealt with them.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We're using the open-source version right now, which is free. I do see some value in some of the more enterprise functions. We're using the open-source version right now, and I was interested in the MySQL Enterprise version really for the tools that they provide, but we decided not to make the purchase.

What other advice do I have?

There are certain things that it doesn't do as well as SQL Server. There are certain things that you can do to swamp the server, such as it is just not very responsive to more complicated joins and things like that. Unfortunately, you have to try to learn what those things are, but there are certain things like correlated sub-queries and more complicated approaches that it doesn't support, and you can hang the server in doing that. So, even though it has standardized the SQL queries and other things, there are some things that it doesn't perform particularly well, such as more complicated joined scenarios. We join several tables at a time, but we tend to do that on well-known indices, primary keys, and things like that, but if you're doing something more sophisticated than that, it becomes more challenging. These things that I've mentioned are written up by people, and once you learn those things, you develop techniques to work around them. You take different approaches to solve the problem for those things. You have to do that anyway as a developer. You don't just write code and throw it out there on a production server. You certainly need a totally separate test environment and all that.

I would rate MySQL an eight out of 10.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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Lead Project Manager, Owner at a tech services company with 11-50 employees
Real User
Ubiquitous solution for a wide variety of uses.
Pros and Cons
  • "The feature that I have found most valuable is its ubiquity. MySQL is everywhere, so if I need to find a developer to do things to it that I don't know, it's very easy to find someone who has expertise in it."
  • "It could be a little bit simpler to use."

What is our primary use case?

We use it for my clients. Basically any website that uses WordPress uses MySQL, so we use that to manage and run our WordPress websites. Some we have on a cloud, some we have at hosted servers.

It is part of WordPress and some clients are using it for eCommerce, and others are just using it as part of the website to give information.

What is most valuable?

The feature that I have found most valuable is its ubiquity. MySQL is everywhere, so if I need to find a developer to do things to it that I don't know, it's very easy to find someone who has expertise in it.

What needs improvement?

In terms of what could be improved, there is not anything that I can think of offhand.

Everything related to automation or improvements are external tools that are brought into it, so it has nothing to do with the robustness of the system itself - it is the developers and implementations that touch it. Those can be improved, but MySQL itself is fine as is. 

I would just say that it could be a little bit simpler to use.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using MySQL off and on for about seven years.

Different hosting systems have different iterations of it. Whenever possible, I try to use the latest version, but usually I'm using a model or two back. But I'm not using the original, not by any stretch.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Everything that works with MySQL is stable. If it's a bug, it's due to the developer who has miswritten a piece of code. The code itself is perfect. It's the application of people who attempt to make changes where the issues come in.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

In terms of scalability, I have not done anything bigger than a couple hundred people a day on a site, so I really couldn't tell you about that.

Our clients are small businesses, almost all of them with less than 50 employees.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Previously, and I am talking almost 20 years ago, we would have used Microsoft Access, which is not a relational database and it's not iterative, so you can't have multiple people working on it, whereas MySQL is a system-based database, so multiple people can access it at the same time.

How was the initial setup?

In terms of the initial setup, you definitely need to know what you're doing, but it's not illogical. The database rules and how they work are very clear and concise. To execute MySQL is fairly straightforward.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

MySQL is open source so it's free.

What other advice do I have?

My advice to anyone considering MySQL is to check the forums and do your homework.

On a scale of one to ten, I would give MySQL a 9. It would be a 10 if it was simpler to use, but as it is, it's about a 9.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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Ertugrul Akbas
Manager at a computer software company with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
Easy to use, fast, and developer-friendly, but it should have better support for big data
Pros and Cons
  • "MySQL is a popular database platform for businesses because it is extremely easy to use."
  • "When it comes to supporting big data, there is space to improve upon the database engines that are supported by MySQL."

What is our primary use case?

We developed a network monitoring software and used MySQL as a backend database.

We utilized the two most common and popular MySQL database engines, MyISAM and InnoDB.

We store collected monitoring data and configuration data on MySQL. Also, our network monitoring solution reporting module is based on the MySQL MyISAM database engine.

We use both Windows and Linux versions of MySQL, and we utilize the backup and recovery features.

To summarize, our primary use case is the embedded DB component for our network management software.

How has it helped my organization?

MySQL is a popular database platform for businesses because it is extremely easy to use. It is commonly used in combination with PHP and Java. For instance, someone with little to no knowledge of MySQL can easily establish a database connection and start programming immediately.

So MySQL improved our developing process speed. MySQL is a very popular and well-known database solution, so it is easy to find a MySQL developer.

MySQL performance also improved our NMS solution performance.

What is most valuable?

MySQL is a fast, easy-to-use RDBMS being used for many small and big businesses.

MySQL advantages and valuable points include:

  • MySQL is a very powerful program in its own right. It handles a large subset of the functionality of the most expensive and powerful database packages.
  • MySQL uses a standard form of the well-known SQL data language.
  • MySQL works on many operating systems and with many languages including PHP, PERL, C, C++, Java, etc.
  • MySQL works very quickly and works well, even with large datasets.
  • MySQL is very friendly to PHP and Java at the same time. Both PHP and Java are our development languages.

What needs improvement?

The two most common and popular MySQL database engines are MyISAM and InnoDB. Database engines provide the underlying functionality for MySQL to work with and process data. MyISAM is the default engine for MySQL for versions earlier than 5.5.5 and functions well in most scenarios.

However, depending on your needs, there are situations where another database engine, such as InnoDB, may be the better choice. For example, InnoDB supports transactions, whereas MyISAM does not. InnoDB also provides support for foreign keys, whereas MyISAM does not.

When it comes to supporting big data, there is space to improve upon the database engines that are supported by MySQL. An example of this is the Vertica DB engine (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...), and offering support for it would be valuable.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using MySQL for more than ten years.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Previously, we used MSSQL and switched to MySQL because of performance issues.

How was the initial setup?

After installation, the maintanence is easy for an end-user.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

MySQL is released under an open-source license, so you have nothing to pay to use it.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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Grégory Tabourin
Infrastructure Platform Engineer at a cloud provider with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 20
Free to use, stable and scalable
Pros and Cons
  • "The solution is free to use, which is its most valuable aspect."
  • "From a user perspective, the initial setup could be simplified a bit."

What is our primary use case?

We are an IT services provider, so the solution is for our customers. I can't answer for the customers in terms of how they use it. 

Typically, customers are running applications that need to connect MySQL and to store some of the data.

What is most valuable?

The solution is free to use, which is its most valuable aspect.

The interface is quite good.

The stability and scalability are very good.

Overall, it's an excellent solution. We don't have to implement anything else.

What needs improvement?

We haven't noticed and features that are lacking.

From a user perspective, the initial setup could be simplified a bit.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using the solution since 2000. It's been about 20 years now since I first was introduced to MySQL.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability is good. Neither we or our clients have had to deal with bugs, glitches or crashes. Everyone's been satisfied with it. Stability is one of its best features.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability of the solution is good. We haven't had trouble scaling at all.

How are customer service and technical support?

We're using the community version of the solution. I don't have any complaint with the level of support, however, it is online and there isn't a support line.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup isn't always straightforward. Sometimes it is complex. For example, if you are doing a database expansion. For database expansion, you have to configure it and you have to know SQL quite well. You have to juggle a few things, which makes it complicated. However, from an IT perspective, it's a good tool, so it's worth the effort.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

The solution doesn't cost anything to use. It's absolutely free.

What other advice do I have?

We are IT services provider, and provide this solution to our customers. It's typically installed on a dedicated server.

When we are working with it, we are doing SQL queries, and on top of that, we are using MySQL to do some reporting as well. It does what we want it to do and our clients are also happy with the results they get. It's a fine solution.

I'd advise those considering working with the solution to be patient.

We don't have any partnership MySQL. We are mostly a Microsoft partner. We mainly use the solution because of the community and the SQL server that's different from Oracle's server. From time to time we have to use MySQL.

I'd rate the solution eight out of ten. From our perspective, it's free to use, it's stable and it's fast and scalable. It makes it a good option for many organizations.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Free, open-source, and easy to use
Pros and Cons
  • "MySQL has cross-platform support for multiple operating systems. The backups on a Linux machine can be restored on a Windows machine, and vice versa."
  • "Improvements are required in character set support, scalability, and big data sets."

What is our primary use case?

The primary use case for MySQL is to develop web applications, proof of concept projects with data collection, data manipulation, and data reporting on both Windows and Linux platforms. 

We also use MySQL to store the data that we receive from different projects and build data models. We can also develop reports out of it.

MySQL is used for small application use only and not used for enterprise-level business applications.

MSQL is free open-source software. This is the most valuable aspect for any company as it helps to reduce the cost.

How has it helped my organization?

MySQL is easy to use and, with basic knowledge of SQL, users can easily build SQL Statements. It helps to reduce project cost for development projects. It also supports a large number of embedded applications.

The backup and recovery features are easy to use without any complexity. Users who don’t have much knowledge of databases can easily use these features.

MySQL offers password encryption and offers a good data security layer to protect data.

MySQL platform independence helps the development and user community.

What is most valuable?

MySQL is a relational database and it is easy to install, handle day-to-day activities, and manage backups. It is compatible with a lot of other shared database solutions.

MySQL Workbench is the graphical user interface tool and it helps with development, data modeling, data migration, and day-to-day administration.

MySQL has cross-platform support for multiple operating systems. The backups on a Linux machine can be restored on a Windows machine, and vice versa.

MySQL supports multiple window displays and it is useful for developers and users who don’t have much database knowledge.

What needs improvement?

Improvements are required in character set support, scalability, and big data sets.

There is a lack of advanced features such as SQLServer, PostgreSQL, etc. I would like to see minimum reporting services and analytics features in the next release.

MySQL doesn't have many tools to monitor performance and fix issues easily.

The graphical user interface needs to be improved. It would be nice to have drag and drop on tables to create relationships between them. Other relation databases have these basic features. It helps during development to have these on hand.

This product is not suitable for enterprise applications.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've used the solution for more than ten years.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability is okay.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We did not previously use a different solution.

What was our ROI?

Its free open source availability provides good ROI.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

MySQL is free open-source software. This is the most valuable aspect for any company. 

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We looked at an SQL Server and Mongo DB.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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