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Systems Engineer at a tech vendor with 201-500 employees
Real User
Top 10
Saves us cost-wise in the amount of time we're not spending with false errors

Pros and Cons

  • "The solution’s overall reporting capabilities are pretty powerful compared to ones that I have used previously. It seems like it has a lot of customizations that you can put in, but some of the out-of-the-box reports are useful too, like user logon duration and website latency. Those type of things have been helpful and don't require a lot of, if any, changes to get useful content out of them. They have also been pretty easy to implement and use."
  • "It needs better access for customizing and adding monitoring from the repository. That would be helpful. It seems like you have to search through the forums to figure out what specific pieces you need to get in for specific monitoring, if it's a nonstandard piece of equipment or process. You have to hunt and find certain elements to get them in place. If they could make it a bit easier rather having to find the right six-digit code to put in so it implements, that would be helpful."

What is our primary use case?

We use it in a few different ways:

  • For general monitoring of operating systems. 
  • Leveraging some customized offerings, specifically for creating application monitoring. 
  • Some external site-to-site monitoring in various places, ensuring that our websites and external pieces are available over an Internet connection. 

How has it helped my organization?

It has given us a clearer view into our environment because it's able to look in and pull things off of the event viewer or log files. We have been able build dashboards and drill down on things, which has helped improve our time to respond. Also, in the case of specific conditions being met in X log, we have been able to get in and take a look at that a lot faster rather than trying to connect and parse through the log and figure it out. It's able to flag that and work us towards a solution faster than normal.

We have a few custom data sources that we have defined, especially for our application. It is able to leverage a specific data source and build monitoring rather than just having it be a part of the general monitoring. It is segmented and customized for what we actually need, which has been pretty helpful.

Custom data sources have given us a bit more information from a point in time and historically viewpoint. In the console, it is easy to compare week-over-week or month-over-month traffic and numbers. As changes are made in the environment, we can look and have better historical knowledge, and say, "We started seeing this spike three months ago and this is the change we made," or, "We started seeing this CPU usage reduced after the last patch or software update." It lets us be able to compare and get a better insight into the environment over a longer period, rather than just at a point in time, when investigating an issue.

The solution has allowed us to have specific alerting for specific messages. If we know that X messages on a notification let us know this state has happened, we can then set that to be either an email notification or a tracking notification. In the cases of a log meaning that we have a specific issue, we can have it send an email and let us know. Thus, we have a better, faster response. We also have integrations with PagerDuty, which allows us to be able to make things very specific as to the level of intervention and the specific timing of that intervention. It has been nice to be able to customize that down to even a message type and timing metric.

The solution’s ability to alert us if the cloud loses contact with the on-prem collectors has been helpful to know. E.g., if we are having an issue with our Internet connection or some of our less monitored environments, such as our lower environments in different data centers where we don't have as heavy of monitoring. Therefore, it's helpful to have that external check there versus our production environments which are heavily monitored. Typically, we are intervening before it times out to say that it's lost the connection. It's been helpful to have that kind of information. This way, we know either via a page or email if there is any sort of latency or a timing issue with it connecting to the cloud. It's been helpful that it's not just a relying on the Internet connection at our site, but is able to see into our environment, then it monitors when there are connectivity or timeout issues.

We use it for anomaly detection because our software is designed to function in a specific way. Therefore, anomaly detection is helpful when there are issues that may not be breaking the software but when it is running in a nonstandard way, then we can be alerted and notified so we can jump on that issue. Whether the issue will be fixed it in the moment or handed off to development to find a solution, it's helpful to have that view into how it's running over the long-term.

It is a pretty robust solution. There are a lot of customizations that you can put in for what you want it to be checking, viewing, and alerting on. As we get alerting and realize that that's not something we need to be alerted on or it happens to be normal behavior, a lot of that information can be put back into the system, to say, "Alright, this may look like an anomaly, but it isn't." Therefore, we can customize it so it gets smarter as it goes on, and we're really only being notified for actual issues rather than suspected issues.

It's been helpful to be able to have some information to be able to pass along to development that's very specific as to what the issues are. E.g., we can see an anomaly during periods of time while this is running, then pass that along so development can figure out, "Is it a database issue, an application issue, or possibly a DNS level issue?" They also determine if there are further things that need to be dug into or if it is something that can just be fixed by a code change. 

The solution’s automated and agentless discovery, deployment, and configuration seems to work pretty well for standard pieces, like Windows servers and your standard hardware. It has been able to find and add those piece in. Normally, if I'm running into an issue with finding something, it's usually because it's missing a plugin or piece that just needs to be implemented, which just needs to be added in manually. However, 99 percent of the time, it finds things automatically without a problem.

What is most valuable?

The flexibility to be able build a custom monitor is its most valuable feature. Because it's just a general CPU or memory, it doesn't always give you a full picture, but we can dig into it, and say, "These services are using this much, and if these services are using more than 50 percent of the CPU, then alert us." We can put those type of customizations in rather than use the generic out-of-the-box things with maybe a few flags. It's been very nice to be able to customize it to what we need. We can also put in timings if we know there are services restarting at 11 o'clock at night (or whenever). We can put those in so as long as it's doing exactly what we want it to do, which is restarting the service, then it won't monitor us. However, if there are any issues or errors, then it monitors us right away. That's been really helpful to leverage.

We use a few dashboards. A couple are customized for specific groups and what they maintain. As I am doing projects, I'm able to make a quick dashboard for some of the things that I'm working on so I can keep track without having to flip between multiple pages. It seems pretty flexible for making simple use cases as well.

I have a custom dashboard which monitors each site and does virtual environment monitoring, such as CPU, memory, timing, etc. It was easy to get in place and adjust for what I wanted to see. It has been one of the go-to dashboards that I have ended up utilizing.

We can kind of get a single pane of glass and be able to view specific functions, whether it be sites or the entire environment. We are able to quickly get in, see what's going on, and where issues are coming from rather than having to hunt down where those issues are. Therefore, it's helped us more with our workflow than automating functions.

The solution’s overall reporting capabilities are pretty powerful compared to ones that I have used previously. It seems like it has a lot of customizations that you can put in, but some of the out-of-the-box reports are useful too, like user logon duration and website latency. Those type of things have been helpful and don't require a lot of, if any, changes to get useful content out of them. They have also been pretty easy to implement and use.

What needs improvement?

It needs better access for customizing and adding monitoring from the repository. That would be helpful. It seems like you have to search through the forums to figure out what specific pieces you need to get in for specific monitoring, if it's a nonstandard piece of equipment or process. You have to hunt and find certain elements to get them in place. If they could make it a bit easier rather having to find the right six-digit code to put in so it implements, that would be helpful.

For how long have I used the solution?

Personally, I've been using the solution for about a year. We've had it in place for about a year and a half, but I came to the organization about a year ago.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I don't think we've really had a time where the application or monitoring nodes have failed. The connection to LogicMonitor has been very stable. We haven't had any connection issues to the SaaS offering. It's been pretty resilient and stable from our end.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability seems fine. Every time we've had to expand and add elements, we've not run into any delays or issues with it. It seems to expand with us as we've needed to use more features. We haven't had any issues with delays or timing. It's been able to handle what we've thrown at it.

There are at most 10 users at our company, who do everything from application monitoring to platform engineering to some developers who have access into the solution for some monitoring pieces. Varying segments have been able to get in and they all seem to have had pretty good luck with accessing and using it.

We are using LogicMonitor pretty extensively. We're using it from low level environments, development, quality assurance, all the way up to user testing and production. We have leveraged it in as many segments and parts of the business as we can. It has been really helpful to have it be able to handle different workloads, but also be customized. This way, we're not getting triggered at 2:00 AM because a switch is on in the office reporting an issue, instead we can adjust those timings to report for specific times of the day rather than any time during the day.

We have about 1,000 totals including VMs and physical devices.

How are customer service and technical support?

The technical support has been pretty good. I haven't had to leverage it, but some of the people I work around have taken it on when we have had questions or issues to leverage the process. They seem to be fairly responsive and the timing of it is usually good. We are usually hearing back in minutes instead of hours. We haven't had any major issues with them.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We've eliminated three different monitoring tools by leveraging LogicMonitor. We had two different in-house, custom built tools that were used for a long time that we were able to roll off, and we also used Nagios. I have also used Zabbix and Orion.

LogicMonitor has reduced our number of false positives compared to how many we were getting with other monitoring platforms. We leveraged the solution to focus it down and only look at the specific things that need monitoring, e.g., rather than every time a service is down we get notified, instead if it's not a critical service, then we can just get a flag, go back, and check it. This is rather than getting spammed with hundreds of emails about specific things being down. Thus, we can customize it for what we actually want to know and need for non-issues.

How was the initial setup?

It had already been implemented before I joined the company. We've added a few functions since then, but the core and initial launch of it had already been implemented and heavily used at that point that I joined.

What was our ROI?

We have definitely seen ROI.

We have seen probably a 80 or 90 percent decrease in false flag alerts.

We move our people so they're able to be more proactive on things, rather than having to deal with parsing through and figuring out if something is an issue or a non-issue, that cuts down on our personnel time of managing the day-to-day processes. That's been helpful. At least from conversations I've had with management, they've seemed to have found it to be a good investment and solution for getting our normal work done, but also for making sure that we're ready to go if something does go wrong.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

It definitely pays for itself in the amount of time we're not spending with false errors or things that we haven't quite dealt with monitoring. It has been good cost-wise. 

What other advice do I have?

I would definitely recommend LogicMonitor. It's something to look at either when signing up for a trial or for a use case process . It's been a great product. It has customizations when you want them, and out of the box solutions if you don't want them. It works and is reliable. Compared to other monitoring platforms I've used in the past, it seems to be the most powerful and robust that I've dealt with.

The solution monitors most devices out-of-the-box, such as, Windows, Windows Server, Linux, F5 load balancers, Cisco firewalls, and Cisco switches. Those have been pretty easy to monitor. Our issues have been with one-off or nonstandard platforms that we've implemented. Otherwise, everything has been pretty easy to implement.

I would rate it as a solid nine (out of 10).

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Idan Lerer
Senior Director, US Operations at Optimal+ Ltd.
Real User
Top 5
Gives us one tool and one location so we can see across our entire, international infrastructure

Pros and Cons

  • "Our installed base is in more than 70 locations around the globe... The fact that we don't need to manage and control 80 different servers just to monitor all of our infrastructure is a big difference. Now we have only one. The time savings are huge."
  • "LogicMonitor provides us with granular alert-tuning for devices. We can tune the alerts based on different aspects. For example, some of the environments are very big so we need to tune the thresholds differently than we would for a small environment. That is pretty easy to do in the tool."
  • "I would like to see more SQL monitoring and database monitoring. Although it has some basic functionality there, I would like to see more advanced database monitoring. I would like to be able to drill down into the SQL execution plan or the storage processor or query performance."

What is our primary use case?

LogicMonitor is a monitoring solution and we monitor all our infrastructure, up to the application level. We developed additional data sources in the tool, which is a kind of customization. We have a Big Data infrastructure, a Big Data solution for semiconductor and electronics companies. We stream a huge number of files into a central location. We load them and we process them. The engineers have a type of client-based analytic tool. Using LogicMonitor, we monitor the full process of the data stream: data loading, the ETL process, the SQL database, and Big Data solutions like Vertica and Hadoop.

It's a SaaS-based solution. We deployed it across all our infrastructure, which includes on-prem and cloud: AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud.

How has it helped my organization?

The tool saves us a lot of time in troubleshooting. It helps us to be proactive and catch errors before they start to be a big problem.

With LogicMonitor we are much more efficient. We have a huge infrastructure. Our installed base is in more than 70 locations around the globe. We have installations in Asia, in Europe, and the U.S. Before, we used Microsoft's System Center Operations Manager and for that we had to install a dedicated server, per location, and we couldn't see the whole picture across all our infrastructure. Since deploying LogicMonitor, we have one tool and one location where we can see across all our infrastructure. This is a huge improvement for our efficiency. The fact that we don't need to manage and control 80 different servers just to monitor all of our infrastructure is a big difference. Now we have only one. The time savings are huge. I can't even calculate them, but I would say hundreds of hours.

LogicMonitor's ability to alert us if the cloud loses contact with the on-prem collectors is critical for us. We use and rely on LogicMonitor to make sure that the infrastructure is stable. In a case where we have a collector down, it's critical for us to know because all the servers using this specific collector will not get any more notification alerts or counters from those servers. We are a 24-by-seven solution for enterprise customers and the uptime of our solution is critical. Even just a stop in collecting information is critical for us.

The AIOps is helpful because with ETL, for example, we monitor the number of files we have in different folders, like in the input folder or in the "pass" folder or the "fail" folder. We are not sure what the right number of files in each folder should be because of different volumes per customer. With AIOps I can know in advance that for this specific customer, 10 files in the input folder is okay, but for another customer it may be 100 files because that customer is much bigger and has more files. It helps me to understand that 10 is okay for this customer and 100 is okay for that customer.

What is most valuable?

The tool itself is valuable. I wouldn't say any specific feature is. It is very easy to customize and easy for us to build different different dashboards and put all we need on one screen and to correlate between different services. For example, in one screen I can see what the status is of my database, the ETL, and the CPU and memory for different servers.

LogicMonitor provides us with granular alert-tuning for devices. We can tune the alerts based on different aspects. For example, some of the environments are very big so we need to tune the thresholds differently than we would for a small environment. That is pretty easy to do in the tool.

The solution’s AIOps for things like anomaly detection, root cause analysis, and dynamic thresholds is a new feature that they announced in the last year or so. Because we have a very big infrastructure, but also very small ones, sometimes it's not easy to put the right thresholds or the right alert-tuning in place. So the AIOps is important. I don't want to have to specify a different threshold for each server. I would like the system to be able to learn what the right settings are and alert in that way. This is key. It's easy to use and you don't need to read too much to understand the visualization.

What needs improvement?

There is room for improvement with the UI. The UI is not that innovative. Although in general I like the UI, because it's very easy to use and very easy to customize, when you look at LogicMonitor for the first time, you don't think that it is a very cool tool. I do think this is a very cool tool, but the UI looks like an old UI.

I would like to see more SQL monitoring and database monitoring. Although it has some basic functionality there, I would like to see more advanced database monitoring. I would like to be able to drill down into the SQL execution plan or the storage processor or query performance. In SolarWinds there is a model for SQL database monitoring. LogicMonitor has some, but not at an advanced level.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using LogicMonitor for three to four years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

In the last three or four years we have had only one event with downtime. The uptime is not a concern. Although, with that event, about two years ago, it was a critical issue.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I don't see any issue scaling this tool. You can install as many collectors as you need. Each collector can monitor a lot of devices. And the UI is pretty fast, even if we add more and more data sources.

We are now using it a lot and I expect that in the future we'll keep using it at the same volume.

How are customer service and technical support?

I haven't seen a problem with technical support. I think that they are pushing Professional Services more and more which, in general, as a customer you don't like too much because this involves extra payment.

But overall, we get good support. We just implemented a new feature of LogicMonitor, the configuration management, and we got a lot of support from them in the last three to four weeks without any problem. We did a PoC on the configuration management to see if it would be helpful for us and their support team helped us as part of the PoC.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We mainly used SCOM, System Center Operations Manager, and all kinds of scripts — VBScripts, PowerShell scripts — that we developed. But since it was hard for us to deploy, we didn't deploy it across all our infrastructure. We are not using it anymore.

We switched mainly because we were looking for a SaaS-based solution and a centralized solution. Using SCOM, we had to install a server per site. Since we have more than 60 or 70 different sites it was a huge overhead for us, not just the installation but managing it.

Since we only used one solution before, I cannot say that we consolidated multiple monitoring tools, but we were able to consolidate a lot of servers into one solution.

I wouldn't say there was a big difference in the number of false positives we had before and the number we have now with LogicMonitor. We manage the tools that we used before LogicMonitor very closely. But with LogicMonitor, it's easier to control it from one location so it saves us time. Before, I had to log in to dozens of different servers to implement the specific alert thresholds. Now I can do it from one location, so dealing with the false positives is much better now.

We also changed our approach. Before, our approach was to collect everything and to start cleaning what we didn't need. With LogicMonitor we approached it differently. We knew from before what we need, so we only put in what we need, rather than collecting everything and starting to filter.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was very easy. I did it by myself in a matter of a few weeks.

The automated and agentless discovery, deployment, and configuration is very easy. You put the one agent in place and, from this agent, you can monitor the rest of the infrastructure you have in that specific environment.

In terms of the solution monitoring devices out-of-the-box, for us it was about 50/50. What we did is that we started to monitor at the application level, not only the infrastructure. The ETL is part of the application level — how many files we have in different stages. For this, we had to develop all kinds of scripts inside the tool. But even if you need to develop a new, custom data source, it's pretty easy. For us it's a matter of a few hours and we can deploy the new data source across our infrastructure. We know how to manage that pretty well in the tool.

But for the rest of what we had to monitor it was pretty okay. It was able to monitor all the Windows and Linux devices, as well as SQL databases. They have a lot built into the tool.

We don't monitor networking and I think that they put a lot of effort into the networking devices, like CO networking or storage devices. They are not part of what we need to monitor. 

We did a PoC. We deployed LogicMonitor in two of our environments. We have central and edge-types of environments. We put one on a central and one on an edge and we ran the tool. We made sure that we had everything we needed. I then gave my team some training — I have teams in the U.S., Asia, and in — and they took it on themselves.

For maintenance, to change configuration and that kind of thing, in our organization it's a matter of three to four people, because they are in different locations. So in the U.S. they manage their stuff, and in Asia they manage their stuff, because there are different infrastructures in the U.S. and Asia.

We give LogicMonitor to our customers as well. We build dashboards for them and they log in to our instance and they can see their infrastructure. About say 30 people are using the tool, as a result. They are mainly IT engineers and DBAs.

We use this tool at different tiers. Tier 1 is our customers; Tier 2 is the field engineer; Tier 3 is our support headquarters, and Tier 4 is R&D. All of them log in to the tool and see what is going on in the infrastructure.

What was our ROI?

It's hard to measure the ROI, but there have been huge savings for us from the licensing point of view, manageability, deployment, implementation, and usage. It has been a huge improvement.

And, of course, the fact that we can be proactive and stop errors and eliminate production downtime using this tool is priceless for us.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Aside from the standard licensing of the solution, if you would like to implement other features, like what we did just now with the configuration management, there are extra costs.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We tried Sumo Logic. I liked the look and feel of the Sumo Logic UI more; not the ease-of-use, just the look and feel. But LogicMonitor was easier to deploy, easier to customize, and I got better support. I felt that with the Sumo Logic I would need much more support from the company.

What other advice do I have?

Be creative. You can be creative with this tool because it's easy to customize. What we did, for example, in the dashboards, is that we put the different components that in some cases can be correlated. We can see an issue in one component and the correlation to the other components.

Also, it is important, at least for us, that it's easy to customize, and that goes for any monitoring tool, because we would like to monitor the application level and not only the infrastructure. It's easy to add the data sources, easy to customize, easy to build the dashboards. Since we have people all over the world, and we don't all sit in one office, if it wasn't that easy we would have to spend a lot of time on training, for knowledge transfer, etc. But I could give it to a basic user and say, "Please go ahead and use or customize your LogicMonitor," and he would be able to do it. This is critical for us.

We are not using the solution's reports that much. Lately, we have developed a few reports, mainly for management. For example, with one report they can see, once a month, what the status is for specific storage, because we may need to charge our customers more, based on the storage size. But we mainly use the dashboards.

What we automated is mainly the monitoring: the ETL, the response time of different services, the SQL server, the Big Data, but it's more monitoring. I'm not sure that I would call it automation. While it hasn't helped us to automate, it has helped us to be more proactive.

I would rate LogicMonitor at nine out of 10. I really like this tool and so does the rest of my team.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Learn what your peers think about LogicMonitor. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2021.
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William Guertin
Senior Systems Engineer at Accruent
Real User
Top 10
Its fine-tuned alerting lets us troubleshoot issues and resolve them quickly

Pros and Cons

  • "The breadth of its ability to monitor all our environments, putting it in one place, has been helpful. This way, we don't have to manage multiple tools and try to juggle multiple balls to keep our environment monitored. It presents a clear picture to us of what is going on."
  • "We have very fine-tuned alerting that lets us know when there are issues by identifying where exactly that issue is, so we can troubleshoot and resolve them quickly. This is hopefully before the customer even notices. Then, it gives us some insight into potential issues coming down the road through our environmental health dashboards."
  • "Automated remediation of issues has room for improvement. I don't know how best to handle it, but I know that they're kind of working on it. I know there are some resources that can do automated remediation. I would like them to improve this area so it could be completely hands-free, where it detects an issue, such as, if a CPU is running high. There are ways to do it even now, but it's a bit more involved."

What is our primary use case?

We are in four public clouds. We are in AWS, Azure, and GCP. While we do Oracle cloud, we only have a small footprint there. We are monitoring all the virtual server environments as well as all the services in those environments and alerting on various set points depending on what it is: virtual, server and service. 

We are also monitoring our colos. We have on-prem hardware, networking, and server solutions that we are monitoring with LogicMonitor. We are in both the cloud and on-prem. The breadth of cloud and on-prem that we have is a good use case for LogicMonitor

How has it helped my organization?

We have very fine-tuned alerting that lets us know when there are issues by identifying where exactly that issue is, so we can troubleshoot and resolve them quickly. This is hopefully before the customer even notices. Then, it gives us some insight into potential issues coming down the road through our environmental health dashboards.

The breadth of its ability to monitor all our environments, putting it in one place, has been helpful. This way, we don't have to manage multiple tools and try to juggle multiple balls to keep our environment monitored. It presents a clear picture to us of what is going on.

When I first started, it was less granular in terms of the fine tuning and the ability to tune out specific servers running high CPU. Keeping a global general standard has really helped. We now modify the environment where we need to alert and ignore those areas where we're not as concerned. This has helped our company in ways that maybe management doesn't even realize, e.g., we're not waking up our engineers in the middle of the night. Therefore, there is more job satisfaction in being able to get a good night's sleep. For example, we had one team that was being alerted every couple hours, which was ridiculous when you're on call and need to sleep. This was one of my first prime objectives when I started: To improve the quality of life, so we don't have as much turnover in our engineering support staff.

What is most valuable?

At the top of the list of most valuable features is the ability to modify and add data sources, to use other people's data sources, and the LM Exchange itself. It gives LogicMonitor a lot of flexibility. It gives the end user the ability to monitor just about anything that can connect to a network and send data, which is a nice. You can take the data sources for what you are trying to do, then modify and adjust them to what your new parameters are or your use cases. With a lot of other applications, you either don't have the option at all (because you have to use what they have out-of-the-box) or it takes a lot of work to be able to enable monitoring something new. That is the best thing about being an administrator of LogicMonitor.

I have written my own data sources in a number of cases. We have also leveraged existing data sources and modified them to fit our specific cases. We don't typically publish them, but I know with the LM Exchange that it's becoming easier to do that.

I know management very much likes the dashboard presentations that LogicMonitor has. They are very comprehensive. You can pull in other things and add them in as a widget. You can see more than just what is in LogicMonitor, as it gives a single pane of glass for whatever management is interested in or whatever environment they're looking at when they are the monitoring software metrics. Then, it is presented all in one location, which is really nice.

We have SLAs for uptime, all our hardware, and all our infrastructure: hardware, servers, and storage. I have spun up a number of services based on the specific metrics for all those devices, then determine SLAs based on the uptime of those metrics. We have a nice SLA dashboard that shows the uptime of all of our environments, so when my manager or his manager comes to me, and asks, "What was the uptime of our environments or this area in storage?" Then, I can quickly look at the dashboard and tell him. Therefore, I really like that feature. 

Another dashboard that we find valuable is environmental health. We have a number of dashboards for all of our products. We have product teams for whom we created dashboards to look at the product, not just see what's happening now or in the past, e.g., what is currently having an issue. We also use it for forecasting, where we potentially might see an issue with storage on this server with a CPU that generally runs high or if there is an increasing trend in network traffic on the pipe. The environmental health dashboards have helped us stay ahead of potential issues that were coming down and ensure we had uptime for our customers' environments. 

LogicMonitor has the flexibility to enhance networking gear as well as handle our unique environment: servers, hardware, cloud, and Kubernetes. There are a lot of features that we like about LogicMonitor.

I would rate it a nine out of 10 in terms of alerting. It is doing everything that we wanted it to do. We did a lot of tweaking in the last year and a half. In the last two years, since I have gotten really familiar with the product, I have been able to mesh with the teams to learn what we need to alert on. Previous to my arrival, we were sending a lot of alerts to teams, waking them up in the middle of the night. We have cleaned up a bit of their garbage so we are pretty clean in terms of what we're alerting on. It is doing a good job of letting us know when there is a problem in the environment, which is nice. 

What needs improvement?

I have struggled a bit with the SLA calculations though, because I have some issues with the reporting having no data. However,  I have worked around those issues and we have a solid process for reporting the SLA.

Automated remediation of issues has room for improvement. I don't know how best to handle it, but I know that they're kind of working on it. I know there are some resources that can do automated remediation. I would like them to improve this area so it could be completely hands-free, where it detects an issue, such as, if a CPU is running high. There are ways to do it even now, but it's a bit more involved. Also, for a LogicMonitor program, it really depends upon the hardware and environment that it is running on to make that call. 

In terms of when it alerts, there are times when we do get alert storms because one device kind of fails on an interface where there are a number of things. Even if only one out of the five things on the interface fails, then everything on the interface will alert.

I would like it to able to create network maps and connectivity structures so you don't have to manually do it. This piece hasn't been a big hitch for us, but I imagine there are other customers who would really like to see the mapping piece of it grow and become a little bit more automated.

For how long have I used the solution?

I personally have been using it for almost three years. The company has been using it for six years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability is very good. There are times when we get specific alerts based on if there are issues with this piece or that, but those generally haven't affected us. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It can handle scaling. It is like any other cloud service. There is a cost associated with scaling, so we currently don't monitor all of our environments. We monitor just the customer-facing production environments. It would be nice if we could monitor our dominant environments, but we will have to pay a lot more due to the scaling issue. So, there's a balance there between what we would like and what we are willing to pay for.

We have had issues in the past with data collection. Maybe it is due to pushing the limits of what LogicMonitor can do, or even the devices its monitoring. For example, we have a couple of F5s that are heavily used with a number of data sources on them and the SNMP couldn't actually pull all the information back in time, which was causing blind spots.

We have probably close to 100 users who use LogicMonitor, not all of them on a regular basis:

  • We have infrastructure engineers who maintain the infrastructure of our environment.
  • We have product engineers who maintain the IT server environments for the products. They work closely together with the infrastructure engineers.
  • We have our automation team and DevOps team who use LogicMonitor to do performance modeling on their environment and learn the automation processes that they have. They also use the API fairly heavily. 
  • We have software engineers on the teams who are monitoring specific server processes.

There are heavier and lighter users in all those areas. We have primary admins who administer LogicMonitor, and we're the heaviest users of it.

How are customer service and technical support?

Their technical support is very good. When we have an issue, they are usually knowledgeable enough to handle it. If not, they at least know what the issue is. It seems like they're sitting right next to a DevOps software engineer because it doesn't take them long to escalate to the developers. They are very good at getting back to us. I would give them 10 out of 10 in terms of their response.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

LogicMonitor has become our standard for all the products. Each product is basically an acquisition, e.g., we got rid of Datadog recently and phased out Splunk. The other solutions all came with their own tools, and we have gotten rid of all those other tools. A lot of that happened before I joined.

How was the initial setup?

I was not involved in the initial setup.

I was at the company for enabling the cloud and Kubernetes, which was a fair amount of work to pull that information in and reconfigure the cloud devices. We had them monitored as regular resources, but needed to migrate them over to monitoring them as cloud devices. It was a fair amount of work with no good way to automate it.

What was our ROI?

We haven't had as big a cost for downtime, so that has saved us a lot of money.

I am on a call every Monday where we evaluate all the alerting that has been done in the previous week. We have gone from constant complaints two years ago down to basically nothing.

When we spin up new servers and network devices, we have NetScans that are going on in LogicMonitor. It's a weekly scan on each subnet. If it detects a new device, then it will look it up in the DNS. From there, we have everything named appropriately, such that they are named in a way where LogicMonitor can, using property sources, figure out who the device belongs to and what the device does. This is in addition to it doing a standard SNMP network monitoring for the device to determine what it is. It uses that information, along with the name and property sources, to automatically assign where that device goes in our resource tree, then starts holding that device. That has been a lot of work, but it has been very fruitful in terms of being able to be hands-free and hands-off for bringing new devices into LogicMonitor. This saves us about five man-hours a week.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

When we were evaluating software packages (and we were already using LogicMonitor at that point), LogicMonitor became one of the few solutions that ended up on our short list because it can handle cloud and on-prem. They are really good at both. Solutions, like Datadog, don't give you the option to monitor on-prem hardware. They assume that you are just in the cloud because why would anyone be on-prem when there is cloud available, then you can spend a lot of money in the cloud. 

What other advice do I have?

We have used dynamics thresholds in only a couple of cases. We didn't necessarily see the application of dynamics thresholds in looking at critical alerts. So, we haven't used that a whole lot. Also, we haven't really leveraged the AI pieces of LogicMonitor. We are at a point with our tuning that we haven't needed to do so. If teams started complaining about specific alerts, like specific servers showing trends, increasing or decreasing, then we would probably do it, but we have been able to handle those concerns with static thresholds at this point.

I would rate the solution a nine out of 10.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Leo Milanovic
Network Operations Center (NOC) Manager at a tech services company
Real User
Top 10
We are able to automate routing of alerts to particular teams and people, reducing the number of tickets we have to check manually

Pros and Cons

  • "The most valuable feature is the alerting and that everything is automatic so we don't have to work at onboarding customers. That means the product is ready for usage and there is very little configuration. We just need to insert the basic information of the device and monitoring will start working right away. That's definitely one of the very best features of the product."
  • "The reporting capabilities are okay but they are not perfect. There are some drawbacks in terms of differences between the information that can be found in the portal when compared to the reports themselves. We can see some of the information on the portal by clicking and navigating the menus, but if we want that same information within the reports it can be tricky, depending on the specific information we're talking about... the biggest disappointment is that reports haven't been developed in the last couple of years at all."

What is our primary use case?

As an MSP, we are monitoring our customers' systems and whatever that might include, from servers to network devices, databases, and software; pretty much anything that can be found within current IT environments. We monitor thousands of devices in our portal at the moment.

How has it helped my organization?

It has improved our company a lot in terms of the work involved during the onboarding of new customers. We don't have to configure everything manually each time we bring on a new customer. Instead, we just establish the collector, meaning the monitoring server, within the customer's networks, and we scan the network and onboard devices with just a couple of clicks. We don't have to do development work. It has saved us a lot of time in that way. 

It has also helped provide a tool for our customers as well, because it is running in the cloud. We don't have to create any separate connections, any special routes to be able to provide the tool for our customer. Instead, they just navigate the portal using their individual credentials and they're ready to go and see their own environment without seeing too much.

We have been able to consolidate every other tool we had before into LogicMonitor. It's our only one and only monitoring solution. The solutions it has replaced include Kesaya and Netadmin.

We have also seen a reduction in the number of false positives compared to how many we were getting with other monitoring platforms, due to the fact that we can now globally adjust those thresholds, instead of jumping from one solution to another and doing the same changes over and over again. I haven't calculated the actual decrease, but there have been major savings there. It has probably saved us tens of hundreds of hours per year and per person.

We have been able to automate the routing of alerts to particular teams and people. We don't want to be a messenger between the monitoring solution and our customers so we have routed some of the alerts straight to the customer or the third-party company that is developing, for example, a particular software application for them. If something happens, only the ones who are responsible for that alert are receiving the alert. We want to reduce the noise and also reduce the number of tickets we have to check manually to determine if we should work on them or not. This type of automation has definitely saved us time, on the order of hours per week.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable feature is the alerting and that everything is automatic so we don't have to work at onboarding customers. That means the product is ready for usage and there is very little configuration. We just need to insert the basic information of the device and monitoring will start working right away. That's definitely one of the very best features of the product.

We use the solution's dashboards on some level, but they are not something we use all the time, compared to the alerts view, which is separate from the dashboard. We can consider the alerts to be a sort of dashboard as well. We have some favorite dashboards but it depends on the usage. I'm the manager of the network operation center team. We have some separate dashboards depending on the topics we are trying to monitor. For example, databases are on one, network devices are on another. We are monitoring different servers with different topics. They are all our favorites, depending on what things we are trying to monitor with a particular dashboard.

What needs improvement?

The reporting capabilities are okay but they are not perfect. There are some drawbacks in terms of differences between the information that can be found in the portal when compared to the reports themselves. We can see some of the information on the portal by clicking and navigating the menus, but if we want that same information within the reports it can be tricky, depending on the specific information we're talking about. In general they are okay, but the biggest disappointment is that reports haven't been developed in the last couple of years at all. That's something we hope will change in the future.

I would also like to see a dark theme in the portal. I'm aware that it has been requested many times before, but that's something my team and I have been wishing for for quite some time. We would like a dark theme instead of having the white background and the very light user interface.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using LogicMonitor for two or three years, maybe even longer.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's very stable. I don't have anything bad to say about the solution's stability. It has been as it should be.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability is also great. We don't have to think about the numbers: "Do we have enough licenses? Can it handle so many devices?" and questions like that. It's really working well.

How are customer service and technical support?

Their technical support is excellent. I have many good contacts within support and we are familiar with each other. They are very kind and very easy to approach. Their support is probably the best I've seen so far out of any company.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

The major reason we switched to LogicMonitor was that those solutions were not developing at the pace wanted them to. They weren't able to monitor even half of the technology we were using at the time. We were pretty tired of waiting and hoping that maybe the next version would bring some needed features. After waiting for a couple of years we decided it was time to move on and see if some other tool could do these things for us. And I'm glad we did because, since moving to LogicMonitor, we haven't looked back at all, in terms of monitoring.

How was the initial setup?

The automated and agentless discovery, deployment, and configuration were major selling points for us — the fact that LogicMonitor doesn't require any agent installations. That makes our lives much easier because we don't have to take care of the installations and the maintenance, etc. It's very good and very useful.

The setup is straightforward. We just create the credentials, install the needed collectors to the networks we want to monitor and that is pretty much it. I don't think a monitoring solution could be any more ready for setup than this.

It monitors pretty much everything we have, all devices, out-of-the-box, including 

  • Windows Servers
  • Linux servers running Tomcat and Apache applications
  • Microsoft SQL databases
  • a variety of network devices monitored by SNMP
  • MySQL databases
  • Dell EMC Avamar backup systems
  • Veeam backup solutions.

There are plenty of them. It's hard to list more than a few of them because we are speaking about tens or hundreds of different technologies.

There are some exceptions at certain customers, but we are working with LogicMonitor to have them monitor them properly in the future. We understand that this is a tool which is being developed on a constant basis. There are so many technologies and it's already covering so many of them. It's understandable that there might be some that are missing at this point.

Overall, the time it takes to deploy LogicMonitor depends on the particulars and the size of the customer. One customer can have, for example, five or 10 different networks, so we may have to install 10 different collectors. We might have a customer that has only one internal network where we can monitor everything by installing only one collector.

Onboarding a client requires one person from our company, and for monitoring it depends on the client. The whole network operation center team is involved, but it doesn't require an army of IT admins for monitoring. It's something which can be done pretty much by one person.

We have several users of LogicMonitor in our company. They include people on the service desk team and some network administrators. We have people in the network operation center, which is the team I'm part of, and we take responsibility for monitoring, but we are not the networking team, which is separate. And our sales team monitors the numbers so that we can bill our customer for these services.

What was our ROI?

We have seen return on our investment in LogicMonitor. I'm not the person who knows the financial numbers right away, but it has saved us so much time and it's also making our billing much easier. We have a fixed price that we pay for the license and that makes it much easier to calculate what we can charge our customers, instead of always having to think about what extra features we may need and how that will increase our licensing costs.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We tried PRTG Network Monitor and SolarWinds.

One of the major differences between these solutions and LogicMonitor is the licensing model. LogicMonitor has the best licensing. That means we are only paying for a certain amount of devices and there is a single price per device and that's all. Other solutions rely much more on a license structure where you need to buy certain add-ons or features, depending on the number of devices you are trying to monitor with those features.

As an MSP, that would be very challenging for us because we have such a variety of customers with different environments and there are so many technologies and different devices to be monitored. It would be very challenging for us to take everything into consideration and try to buy every single possible add-on and license for those technologies, just to be able to monitor them. It would require so much time and energy just to manage the licensing numbers and take care that we are not paying too much for them. That was a deal-breaker for us regarding the other solutions.

LogicMonitor does have some add-ons like LM Config and LM Cloud which have additional costs, but we are just starting to use one of those additional features so we have to pay a little bit extra. But there are just two add-ons, compared to the other products we evaluated where pretty much the whole product was a structure of add-ons that you had to pick to be able to monitor all those technologies. For us, it was much easier to buy one or two in the future instead of buying 20 in the beginning.

What other advice do I have?

My biggest advice would be to have a trial running for a while and see it for yourself.

What I've learned is that monitoring solutions shouldn't be more complicated than LogicMonitor is. There's really no need to spend any more time and energy in learning and trying to troubleshoot some other solution, when you can just start using this one and monitoring things right away.

We have some customized DataSources internally and we are prepared to share them with LogicMonitor's developers at some point. We have some DataSources modified for our individual usage in terms of alerts thresholds, because we found that LogicalMonitor is too strict on some things. If the world were perfect, their settings would be nice, but we have to filter out some of the noise alerts. Because of that we have changed those alert thresholds, meaning that we have modified the original DataSources.

The solution provides granular alert-tuning for devices, although we are not using that particular type of alerting that much. That's something we will be looking into it at some point because we want to have some automation within the alerts. So if something goes down, it doesn't mean that everything else is also down. Rather, it's just the one device and everything else just happened to be behind this single device.

I'm aware of the functionality that, if the connection drops, the collector will obviously try to resend the data later on. But fortunately, we haven't had a single situation like that. Maybe it's due to the fact that Finland has a very strong networking infrastructure.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
AdamGleeson
Pre-Sales Technical Consultant at a tech services company with 11-50 employees
Consultant
Top 5
Enables us to consistently wow our customers and set high SLAs because it reliably tells us if there is a problem anywhere

Pros and Cons

  • "It's the depth of data that it gathers that I find really useful because there's nothing worse, when you're trying to find information about something or dig deeper into something, than hitting the bottom of the information really quickly and not having enough information to work with. With LogicMonitor, there is a load of information to dig through. It's a really good solution for that."
  • "One of the areas that I sometimes find confusing is the way that the data is presented. For example, a couple of weeks back I was looking at bandwidth utilization. That's quite a difficult thing to present, but they should try to dumb down how the data is presented and simplify what they're presenting."

What is our primary use case?

We use LogicMonitor to monitor our customer environments. Some customers opt to look after their own environments, but some customers have us monitor them for them.

We use it to monitor the availability of servers and of network hardware. We have some storage array networks that are being monitored by it as well. We really use it as a guide to help. We monitor all of the key components in the different environments that we have running under LogicMonitor, and we use LogicMonitor as an early-warning system. If a problem develops in a customer environment, and we're monitoring it with LogicMonitor, then we get fairly rapid notification that there's a problem so we can start looking into it and doing something about it.

Also, along with all of that monitoring comes a lot of information logging for things like bandwidth, so we can see how much data is coming and going over different links. If a customer came to us and said, "We're thinking about downgrading the network links that we have," we have evidence to present to them to say, "Yes, it's okay to do that because you're hardly using the network link." Or we can say, "We wouldn't advise you to do that because we've observed that you're using most of that link and, if anything, you need to increase your bandwidth."

The device numbers being monitored is definitely on the order of several hundred among our three or four dozen customers. We're probably monitoring 50 different environments.

How has it helped my organization?

The solution's ability to alert you if the cloud loses contact with the on-prem Collectors is the crux of the solution. The customers are relying on us being proactive and highly responsive to any outages in their environments. A lot of the time, when we're phoning the customer up and saying, "We've detected that you've got an outage here," the customer doesn't even know about it. It hasn't even filtered through and their people haven't reported it. LogicMonitor enables us to consistently really wow the customers by sorting that out. They're saying, "I didn't even know that there was a problem in the environment," and we're already getting on and fixing it because LogicMonitor has allowed us to do that. It's really good.

The deployment is all automated, once we've selected where we want the Collectors to go. It saves us time because we're not having to faff around doing it. That might save us an hour per customer. The agentless aspect of it speeds up the deployment. Once we've got a single Collector there, we can leverage the information that that Collector can gather from all of the other devices. That's also really good.

What is most valuable?

The monitoring is the most valuable feature, the ability to have Collectors monitoring the health of different services. That's the thing that really helps us.

Among the dashboards, it's the availability ones that are my favourites. We have them set up so that they're only going to flag problems. If we look at the dashboard and it's completely empty, then we know that everything's in the green. If we look at the dashboard and there are entries on it, it means that somebody, somewhere, has a problem.

We use LogicMonitor's ability to customize data sources where a customer is providing web services or when looking at the availability of shared storage arrays. That's where we've started to customize it a little bit more to look at specific metrics that the Collectors have.

LogicMonitor provides us with granular alerts tuning for devices and that enhances our monitoring. The granularity that LogicMonitor goes into is really good. At first it can be a bit overwhelming because there's so much to it. But once you've distilled down the bits that you need to be paying attention to, and the bits that you're not particularly interested in, then it makes it quite simple. And when I say "all of the bits that you're not interested in," you're not interested in them right now. But that's not to say that in the future a requirement won't come up where you actually need to look at those bits. The fact that it supports so many different monitoring features is really good.

What needs improvement?

One of the areas that I sometimes find confusing is the way that the data is presented. For example, a couple of weeks back I was looking at bandwidth utilization. That's quite a difficult thing to present, but they should try to dumb down how the data is presented and simplify what they're presenting. With some data types, it's not really possible to do that. 

But that's one of the good things about LogicMonitor: You've got all of the data there. The sheer wealth of data that it gathers means that you can take that data and manipulate it in other ways, if you want to.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using LogicMonitor for three or four years now. We're partnered with LogicMonitor, so we can resell the solution as well.

I work in a pre-sales role, so when customers need new solutions they will come and ask. If I'm looking to scope replacement hardware, or if I'm looking to review the bandwidth utilization at a customer site, that's when I would go into LogicMonitor. Our service desk, predominantly, does the day-to-day monitoring. Whenever I come to LogicMonitor, it's a case of delving into historical data. At the same time, I've got an appreciation of how the solution works and the cool stuff that it'll do.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I've got no reason to believe that it's unstable, at all. I've not heard of Collectors crashing or the main console being unavailable for any extended period of time. There are periods of maintenance where it would be unavailable, but I'm certainly not aware of anything that was cause for concern with regards to the stability.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It scales well; no concerns whatsoever.

How are customer service and technical support?

I've never actually used their technical support, but I know that our guys have, and they've always been able to fix problems fairly quickly. The technical support, as far as I'm aware, is really good.

How was the initial setup?

I believe LogicMonitor monitors most devices out-of-the-box, but that was done with the setup which I wasn't involved in. We've got a lot of different customers. They've all got different types of network hardware. They've all got different storage arrays. Some of them have different types of hosts from different manufacturers. But we're able to monitor all of them with LogicMonitor because the information that LogicMonitor is pulling from them is common across them. The devices include Dell and HPE hardware, such as storage arrays, including Nimble, as well as a lot of Cisco networking gear. It will even monitor stuff that isn't enterprise-grade, but provided that something is enterprise-grade, it typically conforms to all of the WMI monitoring capabilities that LogicMonitor plugs into.

We have about half-a-dozen people who use LogicMonitor, and they're mostly third-line support engineers, so they're quite senior engineers. We have first- and second-line support and they just do the monitoring, but a lot of the really serious investigation, if there are any issues, go over to senior roles.

What was our ROI?

It gives us the ability to talk about our monitoring solution and service with a very high degree of confidence in ourselves. And we can set very high SLAs because we know that LogicMonitor is reliably going to tell us if there's a problem anywhere. That will enable us to start working on it very quickly, which in turn will help us to deliver very high SLAs  and very rapid response times to our customers. Obviously, customers are going to be happy about that because they want things fixed quickly. That is the best benefit that I see from it.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

It's an enterprise-grade solution and competitively priced compared to the other solutions that are out there. If it were extortionately expensive, we wouldn't be using it. If it weren't doing what we needed it to do, we wouldn't be using it. Our organization is not huge, but LogicMonitor is worth every penny that we pay for it. I've never heard anyone say, "I'm not sure that we're getting good value for money from this product." It's integral to our business.

When you compare it to competitors, maybe some of the competitors' products are going to be a bit cheaper, but it comes down to the functionality that you're getting. You're paying for what you're getting, so I would say it's good value for money.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

The solution's overall reporting capabilities are pretty good. We've assessed a lot of different solutions, because if we're offering a monitoring service to customers, it needs to be really good. We looked at SolarWinds and other ones, but LogicMonitor was the one that consistently came out on top across the monitoring requirements. LogicMonitor was hands-down the best.

LogicMonitor consolidates the monitoring tools that we need in one solution. We didn't have any tools in place originally, but all of the different types of things that we want to monitor comprised one of the reasons that LogicMonitor came out on top. It was the sheer breadth of functions that it has. A lot of the monitoring solutions that we were looking at would only do maybe 75 percent of it. They would monitor the uptime of servers and they would monitor the availability of network links, but they wouldn't give us any information around the bandwidth utilization of those network links. Other solutions would give us the bandwidth utilization, but then they wouldn't be able to monitor the servers. LogicMonitor gave us everything in one package.

What other advice do I have?

It's the depth of data that it gathers that I find really useful because there's nothing worse, when you're trying to find information about something or dig deeper into something, than hitting the bottom of the information really quickly and not having enough information to work with. With LogicMonitor, there is a load of information to dig through. It's a really good solution for that.

I'm not aware of any false positives that we get through LogicMonitor. That could be because we've tuned it over time so that we've tuned out any of those false positives. But generally speaking, if LogicMonitor flags something, there is a problem. Sometimes those problems are transient and something is just flagged because there was a blip in the system for whatever reason. But then it resolves itself without any intervention. LogicMonitor still allows us to see all of that stuff.

There are always lessons learned when you're running anything like this at scale. You set things up the way you think they should be set up initially, and then, with 20/20 hindsight you invariably decide, "Well, we didn't need to do that. We should have done this." But the solution allows you to do that. You don't end up fenced into a corner where you configured something the wrong way initially and you can't undo it. If you do see ways of doing things better, you can change them as you go.

I would rate LogicMonitor a 10 out 10. I've used other monitoring solutions over the years, and LogicMonitor does things really well. The console may not be quite as flashy as others that I've seen, but it's perfectly functional. Having a flashy console is not necessarily the be all and end all because, often, if the console is flashy, and it distracts you from what you're looking at. Every time I've ever used LogicMonitor, it's given me everything I needed out of it. I've got no complaints about it whatsoever.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor. The reviewer's company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: Partner
Arthur Tsakissiris
Director at TerreCom Pty Ltd
Real User
Top 20
Gives our customers significant value in meaningful, real-time information about their networks and businesses

Pros and Cons

  • "The concept of developing a dashboard template for ourselves, then cloning it for every single customer, and only having to change one piece of information, is a godsend. That's one of the strengths. We can develop a template that fits every customer and just change the information that is presented."
  • "There are some very specific things that need improvement in LogicMonitor. One is the lack of formatting for customized alerts, particularly the delivery of them to our email channel. We'd also like to see further customization of dashboards. Finally, something that is specific to us as an MSP that uses LogicMonitor, is white-labeling or skinning of the product, so we can make it look more customer-focused for our customers."

What is our primary use case?

We are a managed service provider and deploy LogicMonitor to support our customer base and monitor assets in the network.

We use it for monitoring our customers and alerting them when something happens. We also use it for dashboard reporting, both performance reporting and end-of-month reporting. We are now moving to use the platform with API connectivity to our new billing solution, to enable both-way billing updates. What that means for us is the ability to create an order, have the monitored endpoint in LogicMonitor created, and also feed back into the billing system so that we can invoice our customers correctly.

LogicMonitor is a cloud-based application and there is a small appliance installed on-premises to act as a collector. It's the device that talks to the cloud and is the intermediary talking to all the devices inside the network.

How has it helped my organization?

The benefit for us of LogicMonitor is the scalability of the solution to support many customers with a large number of devices. As our business scales, we are not having to go back and strap on more infrastructure or re-patch this or do that. It's a cloud-based platform that gives us all the benefits that come with consuming SaaS-based offerings.

Our customers are not necessarily aware that we use LogicMonitor in the background. They're buying a managed service from us and we choose to use LogicMonitor to deliver our services. But what they like about it is the ability to see information in real-time. Information that is presented in a way that they can gain value from it.

The solution enables us to pretty much drop a collector and automatically pick up everything in the target IT environment and map relationships. There is still tweaking that needs to happen after that. There can be devices that aren't configured correctly, and therefore you've got to go and do them, but it will at least tell you that some attention is needed. In some instances, there will be devices that it won't find because they're not running any of the necessary protocols to be found. But in our case, we're a little bit different because we know specifically the devices that we want to monitor. Generally we limit what to look for because we know exactly what we're expecting to find. But from a deployment point of view, the ability to drop a collector certainly saves a lot of time and effort, and the tools that are available make it quite easy to deploy and set up a customer quickly.

The collectors, along with templated integrations and dashboards, enable us to automate our onboarding process and rollout for new customers. When we onboard a new customer, we obviously want to be able to do it as quickly as possible. Building up everything based on templates allows us to save on effort and cost. We have invested a fair bit of effort into developing our own templates based on those included in the system. They allow us to deploy our look and feel in the solution we provide to our customers. That's a particularly important part of it because we really could not afford to be doing a custom deployment for every single customer type.

And when it comes to future-proofing our business to support our customers, we're quite comfortable with what the product offers today, and what Logic Monitor has been rolling into it for the last eight to 12 months. It is in line with what we would be expecting to offer our customer base. We want to see continued investment by LogicMonitor in AIOps, application performance management, logging, and enhanced dashboards. Their continuous product development is vital because we can't offer what we provide today in two years. We must evolve what we offer our customers, and that means we need our vendors to do the same thing: better capabilities, more capabilities, things that we couldn't offer before.

In terms of the functionality and capabilities of LogicMonitor, while it is only a small part of what we do through our managed service offering, it's a strong enabling tool to make that part happen. We'd like to think that it gives us "customer stickiness". In the end, it's part of an overall offering, albeit a very integral part of it. Could we do it without LogicMonitor? Maybe, but it would be a lot harder, and we would need another tool that does it as comprehensively as LogicMonitor does today.

In addition, LogicMonitor gives us visibility into issues that we didn't even know existed. That is the key aspect of the solution. It uncovers underlying issues before they require a full, reactive response. That's the value of this style of solution: understanding predictive behavior that might be symptomatic of something more serious occurring or failing.

I can imagine that if we didn't have the tools from LogicMonitor, it would take a much longer time to sort out some of the issues we see. The tools simply throw up an alert and we can go straight in and start resolving.

What is most valuable?

One of the features I consider most valuable is the flexibility it gives us to configure the solution to do what we need to do and what our customers are asking us for.

We use the solution’s templated integrations to get instant visibility into all the technology we monitor. That's an integral part of the solution, in that we don't want to be writing code and having to develop new connectors to talk to new appliances. There's a strong community, along with information provided by LogicMonitor, to keep the tools up to date for talking to all those different network devices. There's a massive library of all the potential devices that we might find in a network, information that is sitting there and ready for us to use should we come across a customer that has something that we've never seen before. The likelihood is that there is already a template built for it that we can leverage.

We started out using the solution's templated dashboards, but we have built a number of customized dashboards as well. The templated dashboards are a good starting point. In terms of customizing dashboards, there is a steep learning curve, but once over that hurdle and you understand the way the dashboards work, how to extract the information and display it, and what's possible, it becomes very easy. The concept of developing a dashboard template for ourselves, then cloning it for every single customer, and only having to change one piece of information, is a godsend. That's one of the strengths. We can develop a template that fits every customer and just change the information that is presented. The templated dashboards save us time getting up and running with visibility into our customers' environments and help our customers because we present some of those dashboards to them.

What needs improvement?

There are some very specific things that need improvement in LogicMonitor. One is the lack of formatting for customized alerts, particularly the delivery of them to our email channel. We'd also like to see further customization of dashboards. Finally, something that is specific to us as an MSP that uses LogicMonitor, is white-labeling or skinning of the product, so we can make it look more customer-focused for our customers.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using LogicMonitor for nearly 18 months.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We have not had an issue since we installed the solution, at all. It has been rock-solid.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We're still a small business, but we've had no issues with scalability. We have added many new customers without any impact on performance. One of our key reasons for choosing this solution is the scalability when consuming a cloud-based product. We don't have to worry about our scalability. If we double, triple, or quadruple in size, we simply consume licenses as required. We're not worried about platform hardware and all the security challenges that go with that. 

Apart from the scalability, the security of the platform, and the functionality that's rolled into it, comes with scale. That includes connecting more customers, more devices, more collectors, and through more API calls. It gives us the ability to do that without even thinking about the impact of adding another block of 500 devices to it. It is fantastic. We just look after our customers and don't have to worry about the platform in the backend.

How are customer service and technical support?

We've had excellent support, both tech support and account support.

How was the initial setup?

From the outset, as a brand new user when we first started, there was a fairly steep learning curve to LogicMonitor. However, now that we understand how to get good value out of it, we find it quite easy. We are at the point where we're starting to automate the configuration so we don't have to spend anywhere near as much time as we did when setting up our first couple of customers.

For organizations picking up LogicMonitor for the first time, I would suggest they take advantage of the onboarding teams from LogicMonitor, their success manager and their account manager, to get from start to operate as quickly as possible.

What was our ROI?

The solution gives us the ability to charge a competitive price for a premium product. The cost of LogicMonitor is built into our service offering. From our point of view, it's a cost component for delivering our service.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

For us, LogicMonitor is now value for money, but we are still on a plan from a few years ago. The challenge for us in Australia is the billing from LogicMonitor is done in U.S. dollars. The exchange rate between the Aussie dollar and the U.S. dollar has not gone in our favor over the last 12 months. A number of the other big players in this space will bill in your local currency, and that is of value to us. We've raised the issue with LogicMonitor.

That said, they're generally quite open and flexible to a discussion around licensing. We're on the the full Enterprise offering. We've pretty much got everything turned on. From our point of view, they've always come back to the table when we've had to grow and move to the next level, and they've given us advice on the best way to do that.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We evaluated six solutions at the time. We then narrowed it down to a short-list of three, and we ended up buying two systems. We still operate two systems today because there are a couple of things that LogicMonitor doesn't do that the other systems do extraordinarily well. That's the way we've chosen to run our business. The specific lack in LogicMonitor is the real-time, live network map. It has basic functionality, but it's nothing like the competitive offers from SolarWinds or Auvik.

What other advice do I have?

Like any good project, spend plenty of time upfront working out precisely what you want out of LogicMonitor, before you race off and start deploying it. Otherwise, you'll end up doing a lot of reworking. Take advantage of the onboarding resources, and even pay a little bit of money, if needed, to give you that leg up and the headstart in understanding how the platform works. If you know what your customers want to get out of it, and what you want to get out of it as a business, the platform will most likely be able to give you what you want. From there, you'll end up in a comfortable operational place where you can look at taking the next step into process automation with all the API functionality to improve business efficiency.

The strength of LogicMonitor is in the dashboards and the information that's available. Every customer likes a dashboard, so if we can give them dashboards that provide meaningful, real-time information about what's happening in their network and across their business, they see significant value in that. Most solutions don't have that today.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
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DS
Head of IT at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 10
All our networking and security equipment are monitored out-of-the-box as well as all our server infrastructure

Pros and Cons

  • "The quick to build monitoring dashboards are the most valuable aspect of it because of the speed at which you can produce dashboards, which have a huge amount of information, across multiple sites. We use a lot of 0-based dashboards or dashboards that give us information about how our infrastructure is performing. The amount of insight that we can gain from a 30-second glance at a dashboard and a very clear view of how the infrastructure is working around the planet are good."
  • "Some of the dashboard capabilities are being extended. There are a few bits and pieces that they could do to make them even more flexible than what they are."

What is our primary use case?

We use it internally for our own monitoring and to monitor applications. We use it to monitor our infrastructure and our client's infrastructure.

We are using the latest version.

How has it helped my organization?

It has revolutionized the way that the IT team functions within the business.

We have a few custom data sources that are extracting information from systems which don't come out-of-the-box. Now, we are able to extract temperatures from comms or server rooms for equipment. We never had that ability before.

We have it setup in a lot of places where if any element of our platform loses connection, then we can be notified. I get a text straight to my mobile, for example, in this scenario for a few customers. We have found this to be an advantage in our monitoring operations because we know about things now before our customers do. It's given us great insight into what's going on. You find out all the problems you didn't know you had as well.

We have a few workflows and other bits and pieces that we'll start and end with LogicMonitor. Therefore, we wired up LogicMonitor to other systems, whether they be the service desk or operational systems to notify people and pass telemetry around or present them in other locations. It saves a lot of time and manual effort. It's safe to say that it has increased productivity. The time savings has probably been about a fifth of our team effort has been saved. Plus, we can do more than we ever could before.

An example of something LogicMonitor helped us automate: If certain alarms are raised, we can create tickets straight into our ITSM platform that will allow us to notify our clients immediately of a failure in some way. We can then run some automatic scripts and things for known situations to automatically try and repair the fault. Thus, it can all be automated as it's all a closed loop. Then, we can notify the client that we've resolved the issue, all without us touching anything.

We found that it can monitor nearly everything out-of-the-box. There have been a couple of things that we have had to customise. The product is fully configurable to allow you to add the customisation if you need to, if it doesn't do it out-of-the-box. We have a number of Windows Server Hyper-V clusters that we monitor. We have firewalls and switches from various, multiple manufacturers. All of our networking and security equipment are monitored out-of-the-box as well as all of our server infrastructure. 

You want to be very quick to extend their monitoring capabilities. Every month new monitoring capabilities are released, both on-premise and cloud. 

What is most valuable?

The quick to build monitoring dashboards are the most valuable aspect of it because of the speed at which you can produce dashboards, which have a huge amount of information, across multiple sites. We use a lot of 0-based dashboards or dashboards that give us information about how our infrastructure is performing. The amount of insight that we can gain from a 30-second glance at a dashboard and a very clear view of how the infrastructure is working around the planet are good.

The solution’s overall reporting capabilities are extensive, quick and easy to use, quite flexible, and customisable. If you have a trend or line chart type, you can customise and change the colors, scales, and different attributes. E.g., how detailed you want the lines to appear or whether you want them to stack? They are very configurable.

We can gain alerts from individual components of a device, a whole device, or groups of devices. It is quite flexible in that respect.

The solution’s automated, agentless discovery, deployment, and configuration is very powerful. As an organization, we were able to deploy it. It was very quick to discover and identify all of our equipment. It did that without much any help. It can identify a device, know how to monitor it, and know how to report on it. So, it's very clever.

What needs improvement?

The user interface is being addressed at the moment. It is about to be refreshed within the product. Certainly, there is room for improvement in that area, and I think that's recognized and being dealt with. 

Some of the dashboard capabilities are being extended. There are a few bits and pieces that they could do to make them even more flexible than what they are.

For how long have I used the solution?

About three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

We've had no stability issues to date. That's pretty impressive. We've been using it for three years now. I don't think we've really noticed any issues. We have occasionally found edge case bugs and things like that, but they've been fixed very quickly. We've never had any outages or stability problems.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have scaled it across hundreds of sites. I have had no issues or challenges at all. It's a SaaS product. It seems to be infinitely scalable from our point of view. There are guidelines for how to deploy it so you don't exceed its own capabilities for each monitoring station. In terms of load, there are no issues at all.

The people who use it in our organisation are:

  1. Application support staff who use it to help support our customers. 
  2. The IT team who deploy it, build it, and present all the dashboards to the rest of the business. 
  3. Clients who login and use the product. 
  4. A sort of executive type staff who use some of the dashboards at a higher level, both within our own organisation and from our clients.

How are customer service and technical support?

The support is second to none. We have access to an instant online chat where we can get an expert with the product to help us straight away. That aspect has been invaluable if we can't do or locate an issue in the help files quickly. They're always quick to jump on, help us, and show us how to do something. You really can't fault the support. They have been very good and able to maintain that as they've grown over the last three years from a fairly small organisation. They've now ballooned but have been able to maintain that level of support as well. That is just impressive.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We essentially kicked out a Microsoft product (SCOM) that did the same thing on paper. LogicMonitor was far quicker to deploy and easier for the entire team and others in the business to use. It required very little training. It has been a completely different product in comparison. It has been amazing how much of a difference it has made to the way we now work on a daily basis.

We had a fair number of siloed systems, logs, and other bits and pieces in order to attempt to monitor what we had. Now, we have just LogicMonitor. So, we've definitely consolidated. Previously, we used Microsoft SCOM predominantly. We had a huge problem trying to implement that properly, getting that working took a lot of effort and manpower, which we didn't need. We also used to use various (or bespoke) logging mechanisms, log files, and bits and pieces across the business, which we don't need to do now because we can monitor the devices natively.

The Microsoft solution required a significant amount of infrastructure. It required a lot of man-hours to implement, and then more man-hours to get any meaningful reports. Its dashboards and charts are very complicated to generate. We spent many months trying to get it working in a satisfactory way. The solution wasn't very scalable across multiple clouds, different sites, remote customers, etc. Whereas, LogicMonitor being a SaaS based cloud product, it was perfect for what we wanted.

We previously used to have a lot of problems with false alarms and things with SCOM. Generally, we get a lot less alarms than we used to, probably 40 to 60 percent less. It is a significant enough change that it is noticeable.

How was the initial setup?

It is very simple and quick to set up. You can be up and running within a few minutes and monitoring things. It didn't take very long at all. Within a few hours, we were able to monitor a multisite organisation. It is very quick to deploy.

What was our ROI?

We have seen ROI. We monitor our clients' infrastructure as well. So, it saves us money internally. We're now offering it to our clients to hopefully improve the service we offer them.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

LogicMonitor is not the cheapest by any means, but it's also not the most expensive. From a licensing point of view, as far as we were aware, it's sort of middle of the road. It certainly has the value for money given the scale, time saved, and efficiencies that we've gained from it. It has been very worthwhile.

We've not had any other costs as this is a cloud based solution. Therefore, you don't need much, if any, infrastructure to monitor. There are a few add-ons along with bits and pieces if you want to monitor certain types of infrastructure or clouds. It is then you might need an add-on. Largely, the costs are upfront and well-known. 

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

At the time, we looked at more of the high-end monitoring solutions, which included things like SolarWinds and ScienceLogic. We also looked at some smaller companies. We probably evaluated about 10 to 12 companies in total before we ended on LogicMonitor. We didn't bother testing any more after that because LogicMonitor was perfect for what we needed.

It started as a trial with a number of other products. We quickly realized that LogicMonitor was a step above the rest in terms of its speed of deployment and capabilities. Then, we went from a trial to a limited one-year, proof of concept for it, which proved successful. Within a few days, we had it rolled out to our entire organization. We were looking for a product that we could then use to scale to our customers as well. We very quickly have done that. We are still rolling it out to new customers, but we've done what we set out to.

We found LogicMonitor intuitive. The UI was brilliant. It turned out to be very quick and easy to deploy. The dashboarding capabilities were a step above the rest, as they are quick and easy to use. Once you actually get the product deployed and get into it, you find it is very scalable, customisable, and configurable. I don't think another product was comparable to it, not within the timescales that you could deploy it.

What other advice do I have?

Talk to someone at LogicMonitor and try it out. I would say that's an absolute must. I think anyone who signs in and uses it for a few hours will quickly realize its capabilities and how good it is.

Biggest lesson learnt: Knowing the value of a well-created dashboard. Making sure that it's actionable in terms of showing meaningful information. It can be quite a powerful thing if you have the right statistics or a way the data can be presented on a dashboard. This has been very useful, and it is great if you can put it up on a screen.

We don't make extensive use of AIOps. We are hoping to get a handle on it shortly and use it.

I would rate this solution as a 10 (out of 10). It's very good. I have been thoroughly impressed.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Randy Newman
Lead Network Engineer / Solutions Specialist at a tech services company with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 5
Enables us to be more proactive in seeing and understanding issues before they have a larger impact

Pros and Cons

  • "The alerting and the customized alerting are the most valuable features. We can set thresholds at multiple levels to alert us to issues that might start happening before they happen."
  • "The biggest area of improvement is with mobile. I'd love to see them improve the mobile app side. That's something I've mentioned to them on multiple occasions. It's one thing to be sitting in front of my computer when a problem or an alert comes up."

What is our primary use case?

We host data centers and transit providers to enterprises, other hosting providers, end-users, and so on. We utilize LogicMonitor for monitoring our infrastructure and for monitoring our servers for some of our software on a proactive basis. We like the depth of LogicMonitor given that it can alert us to problems before they happen, rather than after they happen. We'd like to be more proactive than reactive.

Our collectors are hosted on-prem and we're using LogicMonitor's SaaS platform for our results.

How has it helped my organization?

It has improved my organization by maximizing uptime. That's of the utmost importance to us because the business that we're in is to maximize our uptime. LogicMonitor has enabled us to be more proactive in seeing and understanding issues before they have a larger impact.

With previous tools that we've used, they didn't have in-depth capability. They alerted us when something was down, instead of being alerted before it went down because thresholds were being met.

In some cases, we have used its ability to customize data sources. There are some cases where we've had to either adjust what's already there or come up with a new data source that would allow us to see into whatever it is that we're looking at. I find customized data sources to be prevalent through more of a customized software or app technology. Given that we're more hardware-based except for adjusting what's already there, we don't do a lot of customization.

In terms of having control over our environment, being proactive has been the clear precedent for our needs, given the ability to customize the data source, adjust thresholds and make it so that not only can we see the current utilization, but also be met with levels of thresholds so that we can see things before they happen.

LogicMonitor has also reduced the number of false positives compared to how many we were getting with other monitoring platforms. We see it from within our environment, not from outside of our environment. Sometimes outside of our environment, there may be routing issues with other providers that prevent an outside monitoring system from reaching us, which would in turn create false positives because these items aren't really down.

We have seen a 10 to 15% decrease in false positives. 

What is most valuable?

The alerting and the customized alerting are the most valuable features. We can set thresholds at multiple levels to alert us to issues that might start happening before they happen. For instance, I'd like to know that I'm at a certain level of memory usage or that a certain port or interface is at a certain percentage level of use. That way I could be prompted ahead of time that it is at 65%, for example, and then get another alert at 80%. We can see things escalating prior to them going completely down or fully utilized.

Additionally, with the alerting, not only does it alert on the software itself, but then the capability to alert via different types, whether it be a text message, a phone call, an email, to be able to assign groups, to be able to assign times in which people will get alerted to things are incredible features that we, as a company, utilize a lot.

We use LogicMonitor's dashboards and they give us a "one-look" to see our most important instances customized to our needs, and we have the ability to have other dashboards that are more specific and drill down into certain devices.

As a provider, we do a lot of bandwidth, transit, and transports. We like to see bandwidth utilization on the interfaces. That's the favorite and the most used out of all of our dashboards.

The reporting features are fantastic. We utilize our reporting to look back at historical data that gives us an idea of what's happened in the past so we can look into the future as to needs and expectations.

We haven't really had an issue where we've lost contact with LogicMonitor. They're pretty good about letting us know about maintenances ahead of time. Other than that, I think I've seen it maybe once where we've been alerted that the collectors can no longer speak and that was not a problem with LogicMonitor, but an issue that we were having with routing.

LogicMonitor has consolidated the monitoring tools we need. In the past, we've used PRTG, MRTG, Cacti, as well as more public use types of tools that we've put together. LogicMonitor has given us the ability to see into all of that within one tool.

It has not helped us to automate. We are not that complex of an environment where when we do add additional devices, it's simple enough to add them manually. Our device count does not grow that exponentially. When we add a device, it's a purposeful add and it takes us all of three seconds to add it into the LogicMonitor environment.

The automated and agentless discovery, deployment, and configuration features are one thing that we've had to do in the past with some of our other monitoring. We installed an agent that adds another layer to a device. In this case, for example, the ability to allow an IP address for the collector through a firewall and for LogicMonitor or for the collector itself to be able to reach out makes things so much easier.

There's less to have to deal with. That goes for having to support the platform as well, knowing that it's a simple collector is fantastic and not having to support a whole other platform that goes with it.

LogicMonitor monitors most devices out-of-the-box. We use pretty straightforward devices from Cisco to Juniper to Arista, and all of the hardware capabilities are shown. Again, a lot is shown within LogicMonitor that we haven't seen in other platforms.

What needs improvement?

The biggest area of improvement is with mobile. I'd love to see them improve the mobile app side. That's something I've mentioned to them on multiple occasions. It's one thing to be sitting in front of my computer when a problem or an alert comes up. It's a completely different thing when I'm remote from my computer and it would be nice to be able to have the same dynamic capabilities in an app as it would from the desktop.

But otherwise, at the moment, what there is, is very sufficient for our purposes. My biggest thing would be to focus on the app side of things.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using LogicMonitor for close to three years now.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

So far the stability has been great. We have not had one issue that I'm aware of with LogicMonitor being down. With just the collectors on-prem, it really makes this platform an agile solution that's very lightweight.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Given the fact that it is so agile and so lightweight, it makes it very simple to add additional collectors when you need them to handle whatever you throw at it and however many devices you want to throw at it. It really is simple. Then as you go through the adding of devices, you can select which collectors you want them to utilize. It makes for very simple departmentalizing.

Devices wise we're probably somewhere in the 500 device range. We plan to increase usage as we expand. We have around 20 users. Everybody is IT level, from help desk to network engineers, to some of our management. Our network engineer department handles deployment and maintenance. 

How are customer service and technical support?

The technical support has been fantastic. Anytime I've ever had a question, they've been there to support me in whatever way. Through to the end, they make sure that we are satisfied. If I have a question about how to do something, they're there to help me. If I see an error, which is fairly rare, they're there to help me to assist in that. They've been great.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Before LogicMonitor, we used multiple solutions. Most of them were third-party, open-source. A lot of them were more community-based projects. Support was a little more time consuming given that you couldn't pick up the phone and call somebody. It's something we would have to post and ask questions of others in the community. 

We switched to LogicMonitor because we needed something that was more in-depth and something that could give us a better view. LogicMonitor covered all of that. Between alerting, graphing, and dashboards, it's really an all in one solution.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was very straightforward. The building out of the collectors was very simple. The ability of those collectors to then contact LogicMonitor was very straightforward. And the ability to add devices was extremely easy.

The initial deployment took maybe an hour.

Our implementation strategy was to make sure that we're covered under all bounds, in a public-private and windows based environment. We knew we had to set up multiple collectors and for all of those to talk back to LogicMonitor, which were all seamless. I don't think we had a problem stepping through that once.

What was our ROI?

We have absolutely seen ROI because it has provided us with the ability to see things before they become a bigger problem. When things become a bigger problem in our environment, that means people are down and that particular customer or customers are losing money. We go back to maximizing uptime. As long as we can maximize our uptime for us and the customers, then everybody's happy.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

It's worth the money. I found LogicMonitor to be a good partner for our business. I really consider it a partner because it does so much for us in the background.

I don't find there to be a lot of additional overhead given the ease of the installation and the ease of use. Really, it's just day-to-day usage. I don't find there to be a whole lot of overhead.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

There were a few solutions that we took a look at. SolarWinds was one of them, ManageEngine was another. Some were a little too convoluted. Some were a little too expensive. We found LogicMonitor to be right in that sweet spot where it had all the features we were looking for and at the right price point.

What other advice do I have?

My advice would be to try it, give it a chance. Its depth and ease of use are well worth whatever fees we are paying. We've found it to be completely invaluable to our environment and our use case.

I would rate LogicMonitor a ten out of ten. 

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
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